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Saturday, July 13, 2013

The Wolf at the Door . . . Sort of . . .

Was running around yesterday in a benign and crushingly boring Southern California suburb. Dropped off some stuff and headed out the door when . . . I saw this guy stalking my Vette . . .


I thought he was a dog, then realized he was a coyote.

When I first saw him, he rested comfortably on the grassy knoll . . . not the one in Dallas, the one in the foreground of the picture. As I approached, he languidly turned his head to look at me and yawned. Yes, yawned! He yawned in the presence of The Diplomad . . . nothing like a wild animal to keep you humble.

After a minute or so, he got up, in no particular hurry, stretched, then hung around my car. I don't know if he was waiting for a ride or what . . . on his own time he casually sauntered off.

He probably had had his fill of the neighbors' cats and poodles.

Come to think of it, I haven't seen the neighbor today . . . hmmm?

PS: I will write something a little less fluffy very soon; I promise.

WLA

25 comments:

  1. The coyote seems to have good taste in automobiles. I mean he was stalking your 'Vette, n'est pas?

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    1. I just didn't want him marking my new tires.

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  2. On a high-end car, black is not a color. It's an occupation.

    Nonetheless, nice car.

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  3. Growing up in a touristy part of the Colorado mountains, it was always ironic to me how many of the visitors would spend days putting out food for the animals, then be horrified when they left fluffy out on a rope the coyotes would say 'thank you' and leave behind a bloody collar. It is in this context that your comment about the "neighbors' cats and poodles" elicited a smile.

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    1. The coyotes are quite voracious in SoCal. They love poodles and well-fed fluffy cats. This one looked very well fed. Not at all like the ones I have seen in the mountains.

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  4. It is apparent the Road-runner is sitting in the drivers seat testing the brakes. Meep-meep.

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    Replies
    1. I thought there was a fowl smell in my car later . . . sorry.

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    2. A link to a relevant image. I don't think I can post the image itself.

      http://davidkanigan.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/wily-e-coyote-and-roadrunner.png?w=600

      Delete
  5. I went out to retrieve my newspaper one morning, and looked to one side when I saw movement, only to be greeted by an adult cougar(cat not woman). He looked very bored(fortunately), and sauntered off whilst watching me over his shoulder.

    I went back into the house and changed my shorts...

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    Replies
    1. Those guys are much more dangerous than "my" coyote.

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  6. Hell, we see coyotes out here all the time - usually just once through the scope though - buzzards real efficient...

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  7. Yes, the California suburbs frown on that sort of activity. You are required to become a victim, first. Can't wait to get back to Florida . . . well, depending on the Zimmerman verdict.

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  8. My daughter lived in San Ramon a dozen years ago. House backed up to parkland that was used for grazing. She was told never to let her German shepherds loose on the park side, that the coyotes would make mincemeat of them.

    They are more dangerous than they look.

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    Replies
    1. This guy had zero fear of humans. He was a very cocky fellow.

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    2. If they're hunted very much they get educated pretty quick, if not well fifi as an appetizer and Rex as an entree.

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  9. If you're gonna beg, beg from the best. Who knows, maybe you'll get filet instead of tripe!

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  10. Between '75 and '80, when I patrolled the streets of Glendale, Ca on graveyard shift, seeing coyotes roaming up and down the streets looking for food was commonplace.

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  11. When I was a bitter, RIFfed ex-dip in the wilds of southern Illinois, I was teaching my older son to drive on some back roads. When my son was practicing on the back roads with a dutiful father in the passenger seat, he dutifully applied the brake when a coyote came out in front of the car. I told him to run the critter over, and was my son ever shocked that I'd have him "run over someone's dog". I explained that it was a coyote, not someone's pet.

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    Replies
    1. Just to make your son feel "better" tell him that coyote ate somebody's dog later.

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    2. Well, friend, I couldn't fault my son for trying to be considerate--especially since he'd spent a good chunk of his life growing up in Embassy or Consular housing! I'm sure you know how such places can be something of a cocoon.

      But, while we're on the subject:

      Many of my southern Chinese contacts tell me that dogmeat hot pot (香肉火锅) is very good to warm up the body on a cold day. I can also attest that dog braised with turnips is a good dish; so, while I'd feel bad about eating someone's companion, or, worse yet, seeing eye,I'd be willing to try it with coyote instead of dog. I'm betting that coyote would add a gamey kick to the dish. Besides, the Cantonese made palm civet quite palatable, so I'm sure they could do the same with coyote.

      Just a thought about what could be done with them pesky varmints.

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    3. I guess if the Road Runner had had Chinese friends he would have had lots fewer problems with the coyote.

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    4. My guess is that in Guangzhou, the Road Runner would've made an exotic meal for someone with money.

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  12. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  13. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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