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Friday, October 25, 2013

The Obama Foreign Policy Death Spiral

As the current Obamacare roll-out debacle shows, yet again, in Obama we have a president with the sneering arrogance found in Shelley's Ozymandias; the aloof cluelessness of Marie Antoinette; and the interpersonal skills, leadership abilities, managerial talents, and willingness to accept responsibility of Moe Howard.



For these and many more reasons, President Obama, America's first "mixed race" president (yawn), should have passed into history as a curiosity, a footnote alongside President Cleveland's two non-consecutive terms, Taft's huge custom-built bathtub, Harding's love child, and Carter's battle to the death with a drowning rabbit. Instead, however, this junior senator from Illinois, the man with no discernible background of achievement, has become the most destructive president in American history. The amount of damage, much of it perhaps permanent, he and "his" team have done to the economy, to individual liberty, to people's trust in government, and to our nation's international standing is incalculable. Disaster, fiasco, catastrophe, debacle, I give up, no thesaurus contains enough synonyms to capture the all-around horridness of this anti-American, anti-West presidential misadministration.

He and "his team," along with the low information non-thinking Menckenite Boobus who support them, bring to mind the words of the great Irish poet William Butler Yeats,
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
 Today's topic for depression is foreign policy and the Middle East. I have written a great deal about this misadministration's foreign policy, and am too down to repeat it all. A few highlights will suffice. Here, here, and here, for example, you can find general looks at our foreign policy under Obama, and, see my argument that no real leadership on foreign policy exists at either State--be it Clinton or Kerry--or, of course, at the White House. This misadministration simply does not care about America's core overseas interests. It quite happily threw away our hard-fought victory in Iraq, and is doing the same in Afghanistan. 

The Obamistas care about foreign policy only when the consequences of their foreign policy ineptitude threaten to become domestic issues. Then, for example, we see them groveling to the Saudis, begging them not to reduce their oil production. The President, a sad little man, throws out careless words about "red lines" in Syria and then spends months and months trying to back away from those words, hoping against hope that somebody somewhere will either save him or take the blame. As Shakespeare notes in Hamlet, "For tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his owne petar." Along comes Russia's Putin, a bright, tough, KGB veteran who can smell weakness and lack of conviction miles away. Putin cooks up a peace in our time scheme that will defuse the petard built by and now threatening the hapless American president, and, at the same time, purely coincidentally, save a major Russian ally, Syria's Assad, and, oh yes, this too, restore Russia as a major player in the region. Putin's goal to have Russia back in the game is made all the easier by Obama's grotesque mishandling of Egypt, as I wrote in "Pyramid Scheme," where the US president made it clear that he will not stand by allies and, in fact, supports their mortal foes--in Egypt's case the Muslim Brotherhood, who also happen to hate us beyond all words.

 As I stated last August,
We are firmly in the grip of an appeaser, perhaps even worse. Other countries have begun to see that quite clearly.

In the Middle East, we have shown great weakness in the face of an Islamist totalitarian onslaught, and, in fact, many of our statements on Egypt appear to favor the murdering totalitarians of the Muslim Brotherhood. Thanks to Obama, regardless of what happens in Egypt--and I suspect the Egyptian military will hang on--the US will lose. Egypt's leaders, not wishing to repeat the Daladier experience, will drift away from us. Already we see the Saudis and others in the Gulf stepping in; don't rule out a move by Russia, as well, as our ineptness in Egypt and Syria provides Moscow wonderful opportunities to reestablish its influence in the region.
We begin to see press reports of how miffed, puzzled, and angry the Saudis have become with this feckless man in the White House (here and here, for example). Before going on, let me state that I hold no brief for the Saudis. They have a despicable regime that engages in the export of terrorists and terrorist ideology. Saudi oil money has fueled the emergence of radical Islam as a major player on the world stage. They are our allies only to the extent that they will not allow terrorists to operate inside the Kingdom; have a deep and abiding fear of the Iranians for religious, economic, and geopolitical reasons; and buy a lot of US military gear.

I have long favored declaring our energy independence from the Saudis and the rest of the Middle East and support fracking (here and here, for example). The problem with what is happening now, however, is that the "break-up" should be on our terms, not those of the Saudi Royals. We have a president who makes an enormous to-do about the Sunni anti-Assad resistance in Syria, promises the Saudis help in supporting that resistance, and then blithely walks away. He ostensibly draws a bright "red line" when it comes to Iranian nukes, and then can't wait to talk to the new Iranian ruler on the phone and later announce, in essence, that sanctions will end and nothing will be done about Iranian nukes. He offends the Saudis, in fact, to their way of thinking, he presents them an existential threat to their survival. At the same time he fights to prevent fracking in the US, to hamper energy trade with our friends in Canada, and in many other ways--e.g., coal policy--seeks to sabotage our achieving energy independence, thereby giving the Saudis, whom he has spurned, a weapon to use against us. The irony is that the Saudis will find that their best "friend" in the region is none other than--surprise!--Israel, another US ally feeling very alone and vulnerable now thanks to the madness in the White House. Don't be shocked to hear of an increasing rapprochement between Israel and Saudi Arabia, with the US left on the sidelines prattling on about the Palestinians (Note to Obama and other fretting liberals: The Saudis don't give a camel's behind about the Palestinians; they know it's all for show and all a fraud).

The Obama misadministration is leaving us an exceedingly bitter legacy of mediocrity, despair, and weakness both at home and abroad.

WLA

58 comments:

  1. Gosh 'n Golly Diplomad Sir, landing on your place so very often requires drying out keyboards. Sometimes monitors.

    Soon as I'd hooked my standby keyboard in to express a hearty "LOL!!!" at your choice of pictures and start down your text it coulda been three more times had I not the foresight to not had a mouthful of my second favorite beverage.

    Disaster, fiasco, catastrophe, debacle, I give up, no thesaurus contains enough synonyms to capture the all-around horridness …

    Today's topic for depression is foreign policy and the middle east.

    They are our allies only to the extent that they will not allow the terrorists to operate … and they buy a lot of US military gear.


    Belay that - make it four times:

    The irony is that the Saudis are going to find that their best "friend" in the region is none other than--surprise!--Israel, another US ally feeling very alone …

    Now I don't know whether to laugh or to cry.

    But I always learn something here. Thank you Sir. Electronics devices aside.

    Arkie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought I was going to be first post for this thread. Alas, I missed virgin ground again.

      Delete
    2. You're gonna have to adopt the practices I have Whitewall, I've taken to placing keyboards and monitors on one of them whirlytables. Thataway, when Dip's page pops up and I spew - it's a simple matter of whirl.

      Ark

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    3. Whirlytables Ark? They don't sell 'em around here. I may hire additional staff just to keep watch.

      Delete
    4. Well actually Whitewall, that's just a name for the things I came up with because the proper name pi**es off a friend of mine - the things are actually sorta like those spinny things cooks place in cabinets to store spices on. Lazy ______ are what I mean.

      Except the one I use was custom built 'cause to put devices onit, it had to be bigger.

      Ark

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  2. Simply put, Barack Hussein Obama is a threat to national security.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead.

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  4. Possibly some others have been kinda curious where "Syria's" military has been making gains?

    I'd heard rumors, nothing I felt reliably confident to go ahead and post (sign my John Hancock to) but it would appear ... Russian mercs are very likely operating in Syria. If true making Diplomad's

    ...and, at the same time, purely coincidentally, save a major Russian ally, Syria's Assad ...

    pretty much [I've yet to see it in the papers] confirmed again.

    Ark

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  5. Esteemed commentators and inimitable Mr. Mad, I have (at great personal and professional risk) managed to obtain an uncensored actual video of US foreign policy creation at the highest level of this administration. I now share:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ewgqirs8GGA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There will soon be a knock at your door.

      Delete
  6. Dip, you insult the memories of the great American comics Larry Fine, Schemp Howard, and Moe Howard by associating them with the astonishing foreign follies of the fop in the White House.

    A further issue I have with the O's (儿 or 屙) is that he has aligned us with the forces of genocide in Syria and Egypt. What the Nasserites and Ba'athis did to the ancient Jewish communities of those lands, the Muslim Brotherhood and Qaida sorts we are backing are even now doing to Christian communities that were in place when northern Europeans were still painting themselves blue and sacrificing red-haired people to bogs and the moon. Scarcely a week goes by when I don't right the WashCompost (Pravda-on-Potomac) or WTOP to chide them for their failure to cover that story.

    No, the O isn't a "sad" little man. He is too narcissistic to be sad.

    Otherwise, I agree with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When did northern Europeans stop painting themselves blue and sacrificing red-haired people to bogs and the moon?

      That's what's laid on for a fancy-dress Halloween party I've been invited to.

      Well, except that bogs are now called "wetlands," and the victims don't really have to be red-haired.



      Delete
    2. "When did northern Europeans stop painting themselves blue and sacrificing red-haired people to bogs and the moon?" I think they and a few others have lulling us into a false sense of security for the last 450 years.

      Delete
    3. Well at least a6z has been given plenty of time to dress for the occasion. As far as people painted blue, I'm sure most of them can be found in the Occupy movement.

      Delete
    4. Hey, I was thinking of how St. Patrick brought Christianity to the Irish in the 400's and Good King Olav Trygvvesson gave my dear mother's (Gud hville henne) ancestors the choice of baptism or the sword ca. 1000 A.D.

      By the 400's, the Christian religion was already well-established in many parts of Syria, Egypt, Mesopotamia, and elsewhere in the Middle East.

      a6z, have fun.

      James, as for events of 1560 (450 yrs. ago plus or minus), that was the year the Scots, at the urging of John Knox, adopted the Reformed faith. This gave rise to a long line of important thinkers in the area of government as a compact, right of rebellion, and a few other things I'm not allowed to tell the kids in my world history class, lest the American Civil Liberties Union get on my case about offending the League of the Militant Godless.

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    5. Kepha,
      Yes you wouldn't want to damage the little beggars with the truth you know. It is astounding that they can even consider calling what they do in public school an education.
      I was being a little tongue in cheek with the "painting themselves blue" thing. My though always claimed that if you scratched the more well mannered (the Brits, Japanese, etc) you'd still find a woad dyed wild man underneath and I think she was on to something.

      Delete
    6. It was my mother who claimed the woad theory!

      Delete
  7. Dip -- Have you ever come across the book "Victory: the Reagan administration's secret strategy that hastened the collapse of the Soviet Union" by Peter Schweizer?

    Basic claim is that Saudis flooded the market with oil in the mid-1980s, driving down USSR's oil revenues, in exchange for a long-term promise that the US would protect them against enemies. Deal was later expanded to include the Kuwaitis; hence GHW Bush had to drive Saddam out of Kuwait following his invasion of that country.

    If true, that might suggest why the Saudis are now so pissed off at Barry kow-towing to their Iranian enemies. He is failing to honor that old deal.

    Wondered if you had ever heard anything that might confirm or deny Schweizer's claim.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have read Schweitzer and certainly the strategy he outlines makes sense. The Saudis cooperated with us in bringing down the USSR, helping, for example, fund the purchase of arms for the mujahedeen.

      Delete
    2. Look to the Kuwaitis to take the UNSC seat the Saudis have rejected.

      Ark

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    3. Another aspect is like the Chinese, in the Middle East politics is played via the 'long game'. Just because a nation's political leadership has changed, it does not extend to dishonouring any alliances or arrangements made previously without discussion first. Any such unilateral decisions are viewed with grave suspicion.

      Delete
  8. Well, that about sums it up nicely. Thanks Dip. Accurate but extremely frustrating and depressing.

    LibertyGrace'sGrandma

    ReplyDelete
  9. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/26/vermont-health-care_n_4166221.html

    You guys were right. The ACA was never meant to "fix" anything. UHC is next...

    ReplyDelete
  10. Dip, May we know your thoughts on whether Israel will unilaterally act against Iran's nuclear sites?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not meaning any disrespect Diplomad Sir, but what do you consider the "outside timeline" for any unilateral action?

      The Israelis we know (and is open sourced) combined some time ago landing rights in Azerbaijan - where "US" have few if anything, after Georgia - regardless having arrived at some "accommodation with Russia" - and, if an effective attack were to be postulated, I can't for the life of me see it [an air attack alone] accomplishing much.

      Admitting Israel sees as an existential I note, they've purchased some Dolphins [German-built subs ironically] .... & they've emplaced Patriot & Iron Dome - is it any wonder the Saudis "Gulp" then do what the Saudis do?

      Me neither.
      _____________________

      There's some "literature" I read long ago concerning Abo rain-making ritual. Maybe/maybe not Dave from Oz can confirm the tale:

      "When it goes a long time without rain we do rituals. We do out best to ensure our rituals conform to our rituals of the long-ago.

      We figure as long as we continue our rituals

      Sooner or later it will rain."

      Ark

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    2. It's to the point they have to.

      Delete
    3. G'day Ark,

      Our original indigenous inhabitants [got to be careful these days what you call people] have all sorts of customs which vary immensely across the continent. Some of them are ancient and some, like a Welcome to Country ceremony, recently invented to fleece gullible guilt ridden whities of their hard earned.
      I've not heard of a rain-making ritual but that's not to say somewhere in this vast country there wasn't one. If there was the geological and vegetation history of the continent shows that it was a waste of time and effort.
      It would be futile in the Red Centre as it rains infrequently anyway, in the tropical north it would be bloody stupid as it rains for six months every year [known not surprisingly as the wet season] and in the south it is pretty regular.
      All that notwithstanding this continent is forever in a cycle of drought, fire and flood [see the poem by Dorothea Mackellar, "I love a sunburnt country"].
      As sure as God made little green frogs it will continue long after we and our indigenous brethren are mere blips in the great span of time.
      Stick with it cobber.

      Delete
    4. Well yea David, bu when I read that it was "Pre-Net" meaning Books Only. And as I'm gettin' older now an' could be held truthful in the main I'm subscribing to old Mayfair "for the articles" I'm figurin' could be taken as somethin' approximating nearer the truth.

      Nearer I mean. I ain't dead yet. But I'd prefer Mayfair over our currents if only because "ever bird" from that time'd be likely nearer a classy Martha Stewart which I'd be much preferring over say, a Miley Cyrus.

      But that'd just be me I reckon. An' did take care to put in quotes "literature" in hopes of boomin' up what I meant.

      Here's David, when I can't be worried over a cyclone to look at the local loop:

      http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDR193.loop.shtml#skip

      Pears clear.

      Arkie

      Delete
  11. Thanks Dip. This post is a keeper.

    The fragile house of cards that has been US M.E. policy has been blown apart by the hot air of ego, revealing the essential incompetence of the Chicago Crewe and Progressive Elite which must frustrate the effete Arabist Enablers at State to no end, in their arrogance as the Masters of the UN-iverse, thinking they had this Arab Spring Thing going for them.

    Well, I can't say I am too sorry. Its long past time we weaned ourselves from the Saudi teat. And Israel always knew they couldn't trust the One. I'm quite sure they will have the Princes dancing to their tune, soon enough, and the poor poor Paleostinians are yesterdays news, no matter how many hugs Hillary got from Arafat and her own MB body person. Its all good that the evil Sunni and Shia nutjobs blow one another up without our help, and even better that history will pin the blame on the Dims.

    Time to cut off the head of the snake, and
    "Faster please", as Ledeen would say.
    Who's got the popcorn?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope you're right, Anne Nonimus. My own guess is that it's going to be Shrillary Shrew's shills who'll be writing the history, though, They've got the major media, academia, schools, and whatnot in their corner.

      Delete
    2. I think you are correct. The MSM and progressive transi-nazi's in academia have their legacy to protect, no matter what. So promoting HIllary as the first female President is part of that.

      In the meantime Os Foreign Policy is to run for cover, including offers to negotiate with Iran, including a post-wimp-out whitewash based on "Yer Lyin' Eyes" Rice review of all ME policy.

      The adults in the sandbox already know that Israel will have to take down Iran's reactors, just as they did the Syrians.

      So O needs to be able to say, "see not my fault" in his post-presidential memoir and $1,000,000 per appearance speaking fee lifestyle. We still don't know where all that foreign credit card money came from in his first campaign - and btw, doesn't Vallery Jarrets dad live in Iran?

      Delete
  12. Your best "estimate" to outside timeline James?

    I'm given to understand the Russians won't give the Iranians the tech for "Ring-Sequencing" - of course I'm simply a hillbilly - which would make me being .... nah you James haven't done that.

    But I would regardless James ask, We've been hearing this stuff a long time. (Admitting myself "all" possible maneuverings.) Still the single question,

    "Outside timeline"?

    Not even Bibi gives that.

    Ark

    ReplyDelete
  13. True enough James. I was gonna try replying "smartly" but on the phone with my Cairns friend I'm "driven" to understand (hammer on the head driven) ... in my defense I didn't know but "excuses" seem 1 to 1 exchange rate - ALWAYS.

    Even for hillbillys which says a lot.

    Okay. Everybody except me is correct.

    Arkie

    ReplyDelete
  14. Arkie:
    It seems to me the Israeli's have been partly waiting for the O administration to come to it's senses.Now they must see there are no "senses" to come to. Diplomatic landscape obviously has change considerably. Israel should have understandings with enough neighboring governments (ie Jordan, Egypt, some UAEs, and now Saudi Arabia) to allow more or less unhindered air access to Iran. I think the action of Saudis is key to the Israelis for unstated monetary and military backing. Also Israels' military situation has recently improved in the fact they needn't fear large scale operations with Egypt, Syria, or Jordan. That leaves only Hizbollah and their only real weakness. If they get into any sustained operations military supply will be critical and they can't count on the US. Stockpiling enough to do what's necessary might be their largest determinate. Anyway it's late I'm rambling and mentally disorganized, but to answer your question before New Years. The one thing Israel can not do well if at all is employ a "ride it out" strategy of nuke exchanges, they are just geographically too small.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed to your end point James - pert nearmost anyways. I will say I'm wooried where Sinai is concerned, and now not limited to just the east (I'm given to understand there's some "unusual" activity with VBIEDs making appearances on land and RPGs along the canal itself - very troubling I worry). Egypt I fear can no longer even depend on itself. In the near-term anyway.

      Jordan I think while there's "an understanding" could be uhm ... increasingly destabilized ... unless as Diplomad ably points out, it sees it's only reliable recourse. Whether the House of Saud would go the route required that being, coming into, "the apparent" risking the almost certain internal troubles [the hajj for instance] I don't know they'd risk it.

      But like you mention "some UAEs" as I mentioned above, I could see that as being a handy route for the Saudis to take. Useful even. Kuwait having "some relations" with Iran, but too useful in the equation (far as Saudi interests go) it gives The House some degree of leeway - not much but the ME for a long time ... well relatively speaking - depends absolutely on "degrees of leeway."

      For the moment (could be a decade, depends in my opinion on whither Egypt) it might be a good thing Russia is "holding the line" in Syria ... remember Sochi's coming up as those continually pesky Chechens - oops I mean Caucasians - are always reminding Vlad & Co.

      Lastly, as Diplomad hinted ( ... well those in the loop know he didn't hint) all of the countries capable of forming a bloc - I still worry over Egypt but I doubt any Salafi loon capable of steering an Eagle - anyway, all those capable of forming a bloc have the advantage of interoperability of assets.

      Now one thing I think (I may get in trouble saying this as everybody seems to be focusing on the guy ... too much in my opinion ... 2016 inevitably he'll be gone) but the one thing I think is, if we can avoid "going hot" in the Gulf until then, we've got a chance.

      I know everybody currently seems to be pooping their underpants but just looking at the "Clinton Legacy" (keep in mind, I'm from Arkansas) my thinking is, ... the parents would like to leave something for Chelsea.

      I think The Connecticut Carpetbagger (that's what we called her before we gave her to ya'll) anyway I think Hillary is farting smoke-rings.

      I'll likely be wishing Dip had an editing pane.

      Arkie

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    2. I fear, if Israel has to act alone as it now appears, that they do not have the means for a second and third strike capability. Most likely there has been intense recon by Mossad and other groups for a long time around known and suspected nuclear sites. The Mullahs can retaliate after the first fly over which means Israel's next strike- by air if they can- should be on the ground for "all the marbles". They won't get any do overs. The US may as well be prepared to act in defense of Israeli territory as Iran will automatically conclude we are involved anyway. Then we have to watch for repercussions on our interests.

      Delete
    3. I think Whitewall, if the Israelis do strike and the Iranians really want to retaliate, they've got one sole means and that would be missiles.

      The Saudis are aware the Israelis are as capable as any, of defending it's territory. Any missiles will have to be fired across the Gulf ... yes yes, we're always hearing "the Iranians bought subs!" but just Google 'recent Kilo mishaps' and I think you'll get some idea of just how effective the [3?] Iranian subs are likely to be. (And just guessing of course, I figure we've a boomer or two in the Red Sea and unless things've changed more than I think even Obama might "wish" US sub commanders exercise a lot of autonomy.)

      Israel will make all efforts to pre-empt a missile strike. The Saudi's know precisely where a missile downing will occur. Maybe not precisely. But any missiles downed will fall short.

      What was it Walter Brennan bragged on The Sons of Will Sonner?

      "No brag, just fact."

      Ergo.

      Arkie

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    4. "they've got one sole means and that would be missiles". Theirs or Hezbollah's? That means Israel would be engaged "near and far" with the same enemy I think.

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    5. Arkie, I think Israel's view on Egypt, Jordan, and Syria would be could they cross border and engage us with large land forces in the near term. At the moment the answer is no in any meaningful sense.
      Politically I have no idea how the Dems will handle 2016, with one exception. Unless there is some really big (I know there has been plenty already) unforeseen disaster, they will describe all efforts by opponents as being against O's spirit and legacy just as they did with FDR for 30+ years. Not saying it would be successful, but I'll bet that'll be their mode of operation.
      Whitewall,
      Unless Iran has a nuke now with good delivery capabilities, Israel shouldn't need follow-ons in a do or die sense.
      And finally to address Russia. If Israel hits Iran, I doubt that beyond loud demonstrations of protest and some showy military moves, they''ll do anything. One reason Putin's probably never given them a top notch air defense is to keep them dependent and beholden to him and not invulnerable to strikes even from Russia if necessary.

      Delete
  15. "Putin's Visit and Israeli-Russian Relations is republished with permission of Stratfor."

    Ark

    ReplyDelete
  16. If Whitewall, Israel decides to strike Iran, the gloves will be off.

    In the past Israel has been constrained. But if Israel does decide to go ahead - it'll be existential. No constraints. Everybody in the area will know that.

    Ark

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    Replies
    1. I think so and it may be time. On another front, it would sure be a good time to stir up the Kurdish population within Iran- to what extent that is today. Maybe some nationalistic fever within Iran would give them a second front within their borders to deal with. Russia too might be alarmed by a resurgent Kurdish state movement.

      Delete
    2. Whitewall,
      Israel should give Iran a last private message; apologies to Shakespeare

      If you do not give up the bomb then;
      Bloody constraint; for if you hide the bomb
      Even in your hearts, there will we rake for it:
      Therefore in fierce tempest are we coming,
      In thunder and in earthquake, like a Jove,
      That, if requiring fail, we will compel;

      And mean it.

      Delete
    3. I'm not at all certain - really just guessing actually - but I saw a couple of days ago the Kurds took a border crossing between Syria and Turkey. I'm "pretty sure" Russian "mercs" (Spetznaz[?]) are on the ground - which would make sense - Putin requires some plausibility where destroying chem is concerned.

      I can't see Vlad depending on the Alawites - or the Kurds - to shield UN people. I'm open to suggestions though.

      I've a friend working in Kurdish Iraq (well services) I'm told the Kurds are "active." I don't know what that means - I know the geography though.

      Ark

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  17. Right James.

    Now all we Conservatives have to do is agree among ourselves who is electable.

    2016 is ours to lose.

    Ark

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    Replies
    1. A little more work on his "hillbilly syntax" and Whitewall we might have something for the convention.

      Delete
    2. Yeah that's true. Arkansas owes us one.

      Delete
  18. You've heard the old saying Whitewall?

    "Too many skeletons in the closet?"

    Well. I've enough skeletons to field an Aussie Rules football team - and they're all out on the field. Wearing reflective sunglasses and holding beers. In bottles. No cooler cups and making no effort to hide.

    We're just gonna have to stick with nominating Diplomad.

    Ark

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    1. Diplomad has a Corvette I think, so that might put him in good standing with the West Coast boomers over 60.

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    2. Reckon we can persuade him to paint it pink?

      If we can manage that I think he'd be a shoo-in.

      I'm finished guys.

      Until next time.

      Ark

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