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Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Out of Action for a Bit

On Thursday, I go in for my long-delayed shoulder surgery. I have been putting this off for about, oh, uh, almost 40 years. I originally wrecked the shoulder in 1975 in a skydiving accident.

Isn't that dramatic?

I, unfortunately, am kinda telling a lie.

It wasn't really skydiving. It was a pathetic static line jump in Massachusetts from about 1200 feet out of an old Canadian-built De Havilland Caribou. I came down kind of hard on my left shoulder and it has never been right (no pun intended) since then; I blame Canada, in case you are wondering.

It got further aggravated when one of my sons and I got into a weight-lifting competition with each other a few years ago in Miami. I was bench-pressing way too much weight when I felt a "crack!" in that shoulder, and was basically left with only a right wing for about 18 months--I did, however, win the contest and that's what's important.

It gradually healed, or so I thought, and then about six weeks ago, reaching up to a top shelf for a small box--wham!--the shoulder went out again. I haven't been able to raise my left arm above my waist since; I would make a lousy Communist.

So, off to arthroscopic surgery I go. I want to do it before Obamacare turns my local hospital into a Dickensonian DMV, or, anyhow, how Dickens would have imagined a DMV, if they had had DMVs when Dickens was around.

I hope to resume writing by the weekend and will be in a foul mood, more foul than ever, so maybe I actually will write something interesting and good for a change. One can only hope and change.



43 comments:

  1. "It was a pathetic static line jump"

    Dip there is no such thing. Any leap from a perfectly serviceable aircraft is far from pathetic - sometimes unavoidable because we foolishly become enamoured of green or maroon coloured berets and embroidered parachute wings as "chick magnets" and a set number of said evictions from the aircraft are needed to obtain said beret and wings.

    The Caribou was a marvellous aircraft. Noisy, drafty, uncomfortable, frightening and a pleasure to be thrown therefrom in service of Her Majesty.

    Hope all goes well with the surgery.

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  2. Do what they tell you and heal well! Better to get it done right and (hopefully) never have to have it done again. Trust me, I know.

    LibertyGrace'sGrandma

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    Replies
    1. I hate doing what I am told . . . .

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    2. So does my better half but she has now learnt from experience after a knee replacement to do as her surgeon told her.

      Silly old biddy. [I'm only putting that in as she is unlikely to read it - if she does I'm history]

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  3. Good luck with that, Dip! Depending on what you're having done, rehab after surgery can be a bit of a chore, I understand. You can reconnoiter Medicineland and report back to us how things are going there.... Take wampum.

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    Replies
    1. Wampum? Is that some sort of North American intoxicant?

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    2. Wampum: beads made out of certain forms of seashells, used by Indians in Eastern North America as currency, record-keeping devices, and art.

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  4. Recover quickly.

    By chance, was this the skydiving place in Pepperell? Now would be a good time to try again. Lots of snow coming down to cushion the landing. ;)

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  5. East Texas RancherFebruary 5, 2014 at 7:49 AM

    Dear Dip,
    After dislocating my elbow in Wyoming in Oct and a thoughtful Wyoming Horse rancher ER doctor shattering it into a million pieces......I had surgery. I was lame but for several days not as melancholy about the state of the nation or world, due to pain killers....then I stopped taking them and things looked grim again.
    Allow your self a few days of mind numbing healing.......and then let them wear off and come back full speed, Sir......
    At least you didn't ruin my husband and son's hunting trip to my ranch in Wyoming, like I did. I may never live that down....he is home from war and I fall on the FIRST FULL DAY of season!!!!!!!
    God's grace and healing to you....
    East Texas Rancher

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  6. Dip...if Obamacare has taken over your hospital, with a government coupon, you might be able to qualify for a free colonoscopy while you are there and sedated. Efficient use of drugs they will classify it.

    Good luck!

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  7. Hope the surgery goes well, and your recovery is speedy!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hoping for your speedy recovery.

    And since we're on the topic of Obamacare, did you notice that the CBO says that that law will reduce the hours worked by 1.5 to 2 percent, and mean about 2 million fewer employed? According to Greg Mankiw on his blog, he figures the CBO is issuing a conservative estimate, meaning that these numbers are likely to be lower limits.

    Oh, and it won't reduce the uncovered population one little bit.

    Obamacare, is there anything it can do? (Said in an upbeat progressive voice!)

    Green Bear

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    Replies
    1. Makes you wonder if the West actually did win the Cold War?

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  9. 1975 "an old Canadian-built De Havilland Caribou" The Royal Australian Air Force retired its last caribou in 2009.

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    Replies
    1. You're right. It's my memory playing tricks on me. I was young back then and a plane built in the 1960s struck me as old as did many people whom I now realize were younger then than I am now.

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  10. Caribous were great in Laos. Air America used them (along with Pilatus Porters) to get in and out of places airplanes were NOT meant to land.

    Take care, heal quickly, and by all means, work hard on the recovery. Follow the physical therapists' advice.

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  11. Best of luck with the surgery. As this may be the last gasp of America's once-world renowned health care system, fix what you can, while you can.

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  12. Blame Canada if you will, but over the past 40 years, Canada has moved to the right and the US, ...well, in another direction. In 1975, Pierre Trudeau was Prime Minister of Canada. For those of us old enough to remember, he was Canada's version of Obama. He instituted liberal venues that to this day, have painted Canada as a lefty country. By the way, his son, Justin Trudeau, whose last gig was a radio host, is the Liberal Party leader in Canada and will be running for Prime Minister next time around. His resume isn't even "Community Organizer" worthy, so naturally, he'll win.

    In any event, good luck with the surgery, Dip. De Havilland sends their regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. No, I agree with you. Canada is heading in the right direction while we're heading in the left direction. Canada is a great place and I always have had had fun when there, and it was the birthplace of Lorne Green--patriarch of the Cartwright clan.

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    2. Besides, the blame surely lies not with the country in which the plane was made, but in the country in which you landed.

      Ow, man. America just hit me in the shoulder!

      Delete
  13. Best of luck interfacing with the medical community. Hope all goes well on Thursday and beyond....2nd day post op is usually the worst and things improve from there. Had to chuckle at the initial injury report. I too had a similar experience with static line jumping in the 70s. I blame that incident for my chronic neck pain. Be well!

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  14. Did you get a Groupon coupon for the surgery?

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  15. Good luck with the surgery. Sounds a bit much for arthroscopy but a pre-Obamacare arthropod might handle it. A good friend had a total shoulder six weeks ago and is still hobbling a bit.

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  16. to be honest, maybe you were smart to wait for arthroscopic surgery to become commonplace, as it wouldn't have been back when you first injured your shoulder? :)
    I had an AC separation type 3 recently... no surgery recommended unless things don't get better. I wonder if by the time I eventually have todeal with it, they'll just have a pill. :)

    - reader #1482

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  17. Best wishes for speedy recovery!

    Reader #8

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  18. Dip, best wishes for a speedy recovery.

    But we need you to report back here about your experience with that big syringe of stuff they squirt in you as things start off. Is that twitchy thing the Ohio dude went through a couple of weeks back worth a pile of cash to his family?

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  19. Going early to miss something old Yuri Andropov would have loved! Oh well, do fare well there and come back. After all I don't have that many places to inflict felony boredom on others such as I do here.
    In some other post I believed you bemoaned being a cynic, well I happily dub you "Cynic"!

    CYNIC, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be. Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic's eyes to improve his vision.

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  20. A really good Cabernet chased with 4 fingers of single malt. Two every hour until you just don't give a s&*t.

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  21. A sports doctor might recommend that you get to therapy sooner than non-sports doctors think you should, and not baby it, and a non-sports doctor might recommend you take your time with your therapy, and not push it. With the career you’ve had, I’m certain you’ve had plenty of practice following that kind of advice to the letter.

    Best wishes, Mr. Amselem,

    Minta Marie Morze

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    Replies
    1. Having read my comment through again, I think I need to point out that it was a lame attempt to jokingly refer to the kind of mixed messages/instructions you’ve had to deal with in the American Foreign Service. (**sigh**)

      Minta

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  22. Best wishes for a speedy and good recovery.

    pmc

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  23. They didn't have a D of MV, but they had workhouses, and debtors' prisons, and all manner of similar government institutions--some of which Dickens wrote about.

    Good luck with the surgery.


    ReplyDelete
  24. Well well well ...

    http://vaviper.blogspot.com/2014/01/making-rounds-barry-soetoros-foreign.html

    Arkie

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    Replies
    1. Sorry Arkie, the original was posted by Jim Hoft @ Gateway Pundit.
      In an update to the post he says the ID is a fake.
      thegatewaypundit.com/2014/01/making-the-rounds-barry-soetoros-columbia-university-school-id/?ModPagespeed=noscript
      Long time lurker, first time commenter, Michael

      Delete
    2. Never bothers me to be corrected by accuracy Michael.

      (Still, I'm never one to be too bothered by inaccuracy. I'll admit to occasionally clicking over to Wikipedia for instance. You'll not tell anybody that I expect? I'd hate having the Internet's credibility questioned).

      Arkie

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  25. Good job Arkie. Whether there is a reaction or no reaction, either will be interesting.

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  26. Hurry back on your feet. We need you :o)

    MrBill

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  27. http://ace.mu.nu/archives/346973.php "F**k the EU:" Leaked Audio Features State Department Big Trash-Talking the EU Over Ukraine; Russia Fingered as the Culprit in the Leak

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    Replies
    1. I thought the State Dept lady spoke quite well, if a bit off color, re the EU. My feelings exactly.

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  28. Wife had shoulder surgery several years ago. Our kids nicknamed her "Happy Feet". You will know why soon enough.

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  29. wishing you an..uneventful surgery and equally , fast but uneventful recovery..

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