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Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Greece: At Last! The Honest Crooks Take Over!

Back on June 16, 2012, I posted a piece on Greece, titled the "Grecian Urn."  I had written on the eve of elections in Greece, and stated,
Yes, the Greeks are voting, again. They have two main choices. The first choice, and the favorite of the Eurocrats and Europe's diminished capacity political classes, is The New Democrat Party, which sort of pledges a sort of allegiance to a sort of austerity program that will sort of guarantee a continuing bail-out from Germany, oops, I mean the rest of Europe. The NDP "promises" to push for "austerity" in exchange for staying with the Euro and getting lots and lots and lots of money from, well, you know. In the other corner we have my favorites, the Syriza Party. The Syrizans are open and honest about their thievery. They want to keep the Euro, reject austerity, and demand that the Germans keep underwriting Greek expenses forever and ever.
Back in 2012, the Greek electorate gave a narrow victory to the dishonest crooks, favored by the dishonest and crooked EU bureaucracy, of the New Democrat Party. Well, guess what? The NDP, as this little blog predicted, could do nothing to stop the Greek slide with some $12 billion getting pulled out of the Greek economy on a weekly basis.

This time, however, it seems the Greeks finally listened, and elected the openly honest crooks of the far-left populist Syriza Party. Syriza will form a government in alliance with the other openly honest crooks, those of the far-right populist ANEL, or Independent Greeks. The two governing partners agree on nothing except keeping Germany's money and telling the EU bureaucracy to take a hike.

You can read in the European press all about the great "problem" caused by the new Greek government. Much wailing and rending of garments.

I, however, think this is a great result. It will force the EU and Greece to confront decades of hypocrisy and corruption, and either the EU project, an easily foreseeable disaster from day one, will come to a screeching and well-deserved end, or populist politicians in Greece and elsewhere in Europe will be shown to be as corrupt and venal as all the rest.

Either result is fine.

Go back and read the piece mentioned above and its companion posting of a couple of weeks earlier.

Not much more needs be said.

My dogs are waiting for me . . .

23 comments:

  1. 2 GERMAN Shepherds. Look at their expressions. The one on the Left is saying "Hey, look what Greece just did."
    The one on the Right is saying "Yep, we're boned."
    LOL Perfect picture for the article. Right down to the political left/right Double entendre of the dogs expressions.

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  2. Fine looking animal!

    One of my favorite Sherlock Holmes Mysteries is called "The Greek Interpreter". That is what it will take to explain market economics to their new government. Honest crooks. What the world needs now.

    Last week we were treated by the Washington Post to a nervous story about the rise of the radical Left across the Med. countries. I'm betting the writers at the Post nearly had heart failure printing "radical and Left" side by side. Just a week or so before, post Paris terror attack, the media was full of hand wringing over the possible rise of the "far right". For the last year, Europe has been embroiled in worry over the re emergence of Russia. And none of this has to do with Islamism.

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  3. Currency IPO - that's tragically clever. (from the link)

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  4. That handsome dog on the left looks amazingly like ours-- what breed is he? We picked up our dog at the local animal shelter with no clue as to his mix of breeds-- we were told maybe some German Shepard, some lab, some Great Pyrenees-- I'm guessing he's an Anatolian Shepard mix.

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    1. He's actually a Rhodesian. The breeder didn't want him and he was sent to a kill shelter because the "ridge" on his back is not pronounced "enough." He is a magnificent dog; he is 12 months old and weighs in at 96 lbs. Full of love and mischief.

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    2. Our beautiful Irish setter, who recently passed away at age 16, was the same; she was the pup of a multiple international champion blood line but had a small discolouration on her face, and we bought her as she was be euthanised because of the flaw. She was the most loving and beautiful dog I have ever known.

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    3. In a related dog story, my Pit has been transformed into a Corgy for the benefit of the home ins. co! Next Tuesday the agent is coming to the house to take pix. Ty has an appointment at the groomer...

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    4. Two dogs like this being flown into LAX next week by a local GSD rescuer (near Dip). Consider contributing to their being freed from Korea. Leg injuries from being hung at the meat market:

      http://www.gofundme.com/knx6xk?fb_action_ids=677843075674813&fb_action_types=og.shares&fb_ref=fb_cr_n&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B849373415126231%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.shares%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%22fb_cr_n%22%5D

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  5. that breeder who sent him to the kill shelter should be horsewhipped. One could only hope that one day humans could rise to the moral level of dogs. you have a couple of great looking guys there.

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  6. "...the EU project, an easily foreseeable disaster from day one, will come to a screeching and well-deserved end, or populist politicians in Greece and elsewhere in Europe will be shown to be as corrupt and venal as all the rest."

    Actually, this will serve as a template for the rest of the EU except for Germany. At least it makes things crystal clear. Germany will need to decide whether subsidizing the whole continent is worth keeping the union together. At least there will be no deception this time. But, I think there is a good chance they will decide the EU is worth subsidizing, as crazy as that seems to us.

    Mark in Portland

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  7. I understand the new leftist Greek government has sent a memo to the EU regarding their new economic policies, which are based on a 'carrot and stick' method i.e. 'The Greek EU debt is now worth one CARROT and you can take that and STICK it up your ass'.

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  8. I have to wonder why Germany doesn't tell the EU to go f8ck themself and drop out. They would be better off. They could keep their money, for one.
    leaperman

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    1. Oh no leaperman, the krauts have now managed to dominate Europe by economic means, rather than the tried-and-true methods of goosestepping over all opposition which works quite well initially but is very difficult to maintain. If ol' Adolf hadn't been such a bloodthirsty anti-semitic, anti-slav pyscho he might have achieved the same result. I think they are due a fall however, just as we saw the japs trip over their own foreskins down here in Asia. They sold vehicles and technology at over the top costs, then sold off their older plant to emerging manufacturing countries like S Korea and the PRC who are now outstripping them in terms of price and quality.

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    2. If the goal is domination, the germans have really lost the ball.
      Greece borrowed a bunch of money... Germany has asked them to pay it back. Greece is now going to say 'no', and Germany doesn't have the military to settle it.
      Somehow I think the US is going to end up with the bill....

      Castro has demanded the return of gitmo... and Obama's staff (the small minority who aren't idiots) must be peeing their pants: "Oh crap.. he's just gonna do it!?!?!?!"

      - reader #1482

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. The Greeks are playing out the old saw - if you owe the bank 10,000 and can't pay, you have a problem. If you owe the bank 100,000,000 and can't pay, the bank has a problem.

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  9. I have rather mundane concerns. I was thinking of going to Athens this summer. What are the chances of seeing another November 2012 scene ? I'm now thinking of alternatives.

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    1. Michael:

      There is one suggestion to continue you plans: fly into the Athens airport and connect with a domestic flight to one of the Greek Islands. I would suggest Santorini....

      Then get on the local inter island boats and visit nearby islands (overnight one night stands are good). I suggest Mykonos, Paros, Crete, and certainly Delos.

      On the way back, take an inter island steam boat back to Athens and enjoy a day at sea...

      Also, on the way back spend a night or two in Athens and visit the Archeological Museum and the Acropolis. Take a taxi to the airport for the return flight to USA.

      Wish I could join you....

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    2. Appreciated. I may very well do that. Most of the nuttiness in 2012 was right around the center of Athens.

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  10. 'the real question is, "Do you trust Obama to negotiate something in the US interest?" '

    Trick question, right?

    THWORG

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    1. Wrong thread.

      Violins? Well that's different.

      /Emily L.

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