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Tuesday, June 23, 2015

On Rebel Flags and Progressive Targets

In the wake of the Charleston mass murder, apparently carried out by a piece of delusional and racist scum from a highly dysfunctional family, we saw some of the usual gun control blather, but without any real energy behind it. Most progressives, pace the idiotic foreign millionaire Piers Morgan, have learned that their usual factually incorrect nonsense about needing "more gun control" tends to fall on deaf ears, and, politically, is going nowhere. In fact, the trend seems running in the opposite direction, with many states--and Puerto Rico, I might add--scrapping anti-gun legislation and regulation. So, in keeping with their tactics outlined in my June 5 post, the progressives have launched an attack on a different target, the Confederate battle flag which flies over the South Carolina State Capitol building in Columbia since 1961 (here is one version of the history of that). Let us not forget, of course, that the Confederate flag is not the real target either.

Full disclosure: My view on the Rebel flag and other Confederate symbols is clear. I do not, never have, and never will fly or paste any Confederate symbol, flag, battle or otherwise, over my house, or on my vehicles, clothing, or coffee mugs, etc. I spent my professional life representing one flag, that of the USA, and have no loyalty to any other. I admire the courage and fighting spirit, as well as the tactical and strategic talents of Confederate Generals and soldiers, love reading about the Civil War and visiting battle sites such as Gettysburg and Vicksburg. I, however, am pro-Union, pro-Stars-and-Stripes, anti-slavery, pro-Lincoln, pro-Grant, pro-Sherman, pro-Frederick Douglass just about all the way. I do not share in the sympathy for and romanticism of some for the Southern cause in the, ahem, "War of Northern Aggression." Slavery was an inherited curse on our nation which we should have dispelled long before it came to war--and, yes, I do see slavery as the overriding reason for the great 1861-65 war, and, of course, as the proximate cause for the creation of the Republican Party shortly before that war. Men such as Washington and Jefferson, both slave owners, knew slavery was evil, but compromised with that "peculiar institution" to our long-standing misfortune. Great men, great flaws. I fully understand why black Americans could and would find Confederate flags and other symbols offensive. We, of course, can debate all this in saecula saeculorum and never reach consensus. End of Full Disclosure

OK, back to the issue at hand. All that said, I also think that the issue of the Confederate battle flag and whether to fly it over State properties is a decision for the people of South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Arkansas or anywhere else it flies. It has nothing to do with gun violence, and, let us remind the progressives, it was the Republican party that defeated that flag and for what it stood in the first place. In addition, the greatest practitioners of gun violence, of course, are found in liberal Democratic constituencies, e.g., Detroit, Atlanta, Chicago, east Los Angeles, etc.

Understatement Warning: The practitioners of gun violence tend not to be whites. Whites, racist or otherwise, killing blacks is a rare phenomenon in the USA. The shooting in Charleston proved a horrid exception to that; so, of course, the progressives and their echo-chamber media seize on the exception, ignoring the many black on black killings that took place the same day, and look for ways to use it to advance The Agenda. They also pervert history by trying to tie the Confederacy to the Republicans--a grotesque distortion made possible by the low-information consumers of media and Hollywood nonsense. End of Understatement Warning.

While we should not forget it was Democratic governors who hoisted the Rebel flag, and that the KKK was the armed wing of the Democratic Party, and that Jim Crow segregation was instituted and maintained by the Democrats, and that it was a Republican President, Dwight Eisenhower, and a Republican Chief Justice, Earl Warren, who began dismantling the Democratic party's segregation policies, let's put all that history aside, for now. Let's, instead, look at the shooting in Charleston. The alleged killer, whose name I will not reproduce here, had a website (I won't link to it) on which he published a "manifesto." One of the things that comes through most clearly is that he could find no other male, Southern whites to go along with his plan to murder black citizens. He complained that all he heard at school, yes, school in "racist" South Carolina, was talk about getting along with all races. Yes, "racist" South Carolina which has elected the daughter of Indian immigrants as Governor. His hatred for black people came from somewhere else in his twisted mind. He adopted the symbols of the Confederacy, Rhodesia, and apartheid South Africa, and posed himself burning the US flag--much as do many of the progressives who demand the elimination of the Rebel flag. He was no Tea Party "radical"; no member of the GOP; no fanatical supporter of Mitt Romney; no ardent follower of FOX News. Nope, none of that. The Confederate battle flag did not drive him to murder anymore than I, assume, the Black Panther flag drove the black mass murderer at the Washington DC Navy Yard nearly two years ago.

None of this, however, stops the progressives when they get a bone in their toothy jaws. They drove the media into a frenzy about the Rebel flag. As I said before, whether States remove the flag or not from their public properties is an issue for those States; but the crowd was whipped up and South Carolina's Republican Governor and legislature gave in. Democrats are very good at lynch mobs. That's not the way I would have liked to see the issue decided. The more important point, of course, is that progressives aren't stopping there. They already have Mau-Maued big retailers, e.g., Walmart, EBay, Amazon, into pulling merchandise with Confederate symbols. A major flag maker has announced that it will no longer make and sell Confederate flags.

No gun deaths will be averted by all this. Racism will not decrease because of this. Neither of those is the real target. The real target is attacking white male culture, especially the hated "Redneck" culture, which progressives cannot stand. The real target is trying to stigmatize white males and cowing them into politically correct submission. For you see, in the Hollywood movie that runs in an endless loop inside the heads of progressives, white males, especially in the South, are all Rebel flag-waving, pick-up driving, gun maniac racists just dying to kill black men and rape black women.

BOLD PREDICTION: THE NEXT STEP WILL BE TO DEMAND THAT CONFEDERATE SYMBOLS BE DECLARED HATE SPEECH. We will see kids sent home from school for having Confederate flags on their shirts; cars with Confederate decals will be banned from certain areas; and we might see the expunging of CSA symbols from movies and books and prohibiting Confederate flags at re-enactment events, etc. History must conform to the Progressive dictate of the day. END OF BOLD PREDICTION.

If that is to be--and it will--I, in turn, demand progressives stop wearing Che t-shirts. I insist they stop waving the "Palestinian" flag. I propose that we all demand that Maryland alter its flag which consists of the heraldic banner of Lord Baltimore. I find offensive the yearning for royalty and feudalism. The Union Flag must be struck from the flag of Hawaii. I find offensive this paean to colonialism. The Alabama flag has troubling similarly to the Scottish flag and might prove offensive to those of Welsh descent. Will Walmart stop selling items made in China, an offensive state if ever there was one? Will there be a ban on Mexican flags considering the horrid history of human rights in that country? What about the Japanese flag? Why should Japan be able to keep the flag under which millions of Chinese, Malays, Filipinos, Koreans, Pacific Islanders, Indians, and whites were tortured and murdered? I am sure we can turn this into a drinking game.

Meanwhile, the people of Charleston showed real class as they honored the victims and sought to promote unity rather than division.

52 comments:

  1. Slavery was an inherited curse...

    Can't be said often enough.

    ...knew slavery was evil, but comprised ...

    Compromised?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, fixed. Predictive text drives me mad . . .

      Delete
  2. Starbucks Coffee should be grateful that the murderer did not appear in any picture drinking coffee from one of their cups.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dip - one of your finest.

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  4. These "progressives" will focus on these side issues like the flag and 2nd Amendment all they like. Being Southern has nothing to do with either. In our home, we have never owned a confederate flag. We have an American flag which we display on occasions. We have no need for a Confederate flag to prove anything. My people landed on the shore of southeastern Virginia in the late 1600s. My wife's people landed in Charleston, SC and Wilmington, NC in the early 1700s.

    Our people served in the American Revolution, War of 1812, Mexican War and one on each side served in the CSA until killed in battle. None of our people were wealthy enough to own slaves as all were subsistence farmers. Over the decades, more and more Scots Irish, English and then Germans found their way across the pond and joined us here in the Carolinas and other states all the way to Texas.

    Being Southern is something you are born to and there are traits most of us have in common: remember our ancestry, remember why we came and settled here, remember what it took to stay free and remember who tried to take our freedom- from the British of old to the enemies of the 20th century to the proxy of those enemies acting today right in our own government. As a people, we don't forget any of it and we won't now. As the retired Democrat Senator Jim Webb from Va. wrote in his book "Born Fighting", that's us if it comes to it. We don't need THAT flag. We have THE Flag.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Another fine essay, Dip. Were partisan history reversed on this matter, Democrats would be howling to the rooftops how Republicans hated minorities. As it is, there is little mention of the Democrat antecedents of the racial policies. It bears repeating. Constantly.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anyone who believes in diversity ought surely to want to protect the right to fly that rag.

    Like you, I can't imagine there's much to learn from the murderous antics of a paranoid schizophrenic (or whatever the diagnosis turns out to be) save for the speculation that there would be fewer outrages like that if there were less publicity about the ones that do happen.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Confederate Flag story is way overdone. I don't have a dog in the fight cuz I'm a New Yorker. I see and understand both sides of the argument. I have other blogger friends that fly the Rebel Flag with no beef from me and if others hate it I respect that too. Far be it from me to tell another state what to do.

    Thank you for adding The Last Tradition to your blog roll. I've returned the solid and put you on my blog roll.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good thing Roof wasn't wearing a "Che" t-shirt because we'd never hear the end of it.

    Oh, wait!

    ReplyDelete
  9. The attack on the battle flag of the Confederacy has NOTHING to with the flag, and EVERYTHING to do with rewriting history to suit the progressive agenda. As always. After all, whomever can rewrite the past can control the present. Whomever controls the present determines the future. And we all know where that leads...a very, very bad place!

    As Rush Limbaugh pointed out yesterday, the next step is to attach the American flag for everything bad it supposedly represents. What he failed to mention is that the attack on that flag has already been in progress for a long, long time...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We fought the Cold War and won for nothing it seems. And now we intend to lose to the proxies of our former enemy. Our threats are from the outside. Our enemy is within.

      Delete
  10. You may have forgotten ... General Sherman was the military man at the head of the Trail of Tears ... not his finest moment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. That is just more of the racism that underpins all opposition to Lincolnism-Shermanism.

      Some even hate truth to the point of claiming it was illegal. The Cherokee were not under the authority of the Federal government, were not US persons, and hence dealing with them fell under the scope of the executive power.

      The Cherokee did not have the manpower to create a rival nation state in the area.

      They had the manpower for endemic warfare with the locals, war that they would ultimately lose. Probably very few would have escaped as individuals, likely to the north.

      So their strategy in remaining might've involved the support of the European power. France and the UK had a history of supporting and using such against the colonists. It would've been unreasonable to expect them to keep their noses clean.

      Anti Democrat

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    3. That would have been rather difficult, since Sherman wasn't in the army at the time.

      Delete
  11. But... it's a damn fine looking flag.

    I like the "don't tread on me" flags as well, and there's a very fine early flag with the stripes and a union jack in one corner.

    My opinion that you chose the wrong flag will doubtless go down like a bucket of cold sick ... but hey, it's a free country (just about!)

    Be thankful for small mercies - you don't have a bunch of chinless wonders from Brussels (WTF's that?) insisting you fly the sodding EU flag alongside your own flag on all public buildings...

    ReplyDelete
  12. The Democrats have no grounds for complaint on this issue, because they have the like of W. Wilson and L. Johnson. No matter how much they whitewash their history, their use of the brand remains problematic, to use the modern SJW term.

    Anti-Democrat

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  13. I honor your overall post Diplomad Sir.

    A very slight quibble, not to do with anything in your post but what Mr. Robinson states where he's linked herein '(here is one version of the history of that)' he states;

    "... after Little Rock, after desegregation began ..."

    There was actually, a Before Little Rock. Notably Hoxie Arkansas, located on off all locales, The Delta.

    http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?search=1&entryID=731

    To the credit of the good folks of Hoxie, Arkansas.

    As the Superintendent of Schools later explained (1955, two years prior to Central High School) "It was right in the sight of God."

    ReplyDelete
  14. As a descendant on the maternal side of Pennsylvania Quakers who were ferocious abolitionists, I yield to no one in my sentiments as an unreconstructed Unionist ... but this Confederate flag kerfuffle (not for sale through Amazon, Walmart, etc ... really?!) makes me want to go out and buy one, just because I'm being told that I can't have one. There is something absolutely Orwellian, about erasing our history, just because the racial justice warriors stamp their feet and demand it.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I am a Unionist, and in sentiment agree with the Radical Republicans of the immediate post war era.

      This stuff about the Star and Bars is nonsense.

      Have they no feeling for men of valor, no matter the creed? Of course not. They have no regard for oaths or our sacred dead. They see only a slate that they may wipe clean and write whatever they want upon.

      Anti Democrat

      Delete
  15. Let me quote from one of my recent blog entries:

    "Now for some important (and apparently forgotten) historical context ... after General Ulysses S. Grant accepted General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Virginia ending our bloody Civil War ... wherein he allowed the Confederate soldiers to keep their weapons and flags and instructed them just to go back to their homes ... General Grant, in a gesture of reconciliation, had the Union band strike up Dixie as General Lee was leaving the courthouse and his soldiers were disbanding. Thus we see the stark contrast between political greatness and historically-blind puerile pandering."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Edward M Stanton quickly put an end to Lincoln's concept of tolerance and readmission of the Confederate states.

      Delete
  16. Hearing Yankees talk about solutions
    to the Southern PROBLEM, reminds me
    of Nazis talking about solutions to
    the Jewish PROBLEM.

    Judge you a wolf snared in a trap, a
    bear baited in a cage, a bull stalked
    about the ring? Judge not the South
    or Southerners until freed from the
    prison, the constant sting of the
    cattle prod, their reaction to the
    crack of the whip, of their Yankee
    jailers.

    When the South is free to follow her
    own path, strike her own course free
    of her Yankee tormentors, then and
    only then may she be truly judged.
    Until then, you are but witness to
    her imprisonment and torture,
    snapping at the bars of her cage.

    If the gore were wrung from the
    Yankee and Union Jacks, the very
    seas of the earth would turn red
    with the blood of the innocent.

    How dare you.

    ReplyDelete
  17. The businessman and the politician
    are the only animals with an
    indoskeleton that can survive
    without a backbone.

    ReplyDelete
  18. No one likes to remember that "Redneck" is a term of derision, coined by Black slaves, to describe NON SLAVE-HOLDING whites, who worked their own fields, and thus suffered sunburn on the neck. Once again, the so-called Democrats show their contempt for actual working class Americans.

    Michael Adams

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually the "red neck" came fron the reins of the plow horse chaffing their necks as their two hands were on the plow ...

      Delete
    2. Naw, George, the plowing is only a couple of months of the year. The hoe and the picking were a lot more of the time.

      Delete
    3. Maybe a little was sunburn ... but then these farmers would get sunburned also on all their exposed skin ... not just their necks. And farmers then were behind horses (or mules) for a lot more than just plowing ... seeding, weeding, and harvesting. I still think that the majority was from the reins chaffing.

      Delete
    4. Harrowing and manure spreading too ...

      Delete
    5. Don't you remember, George, that farmers wore long-sleeved shirts in the fields? Maybe you are not as old as I am? I was born in 1950, and, fifty years earlier, all of my great grand fathers we listed in the census as farmers, although three out of four had already escaped that hard life. They grew up on farms, of course, and fifty years later, their kids and widows still spoke in the farming idiom.

      Totally off-topic, but I particularly love the Book of Ruth, because it is set in the period of the Judges of Israel, which found a lot of echoes in frontier Texas. The way people thought, the way they related to one another, courted, did business, married. Boaz reminds me of a couple of my great grandfathers. Ruth seems a little wimpy, but Naomi, now there was a woman of Force!

      Delete
  19. "General Sherman was the military man at the head of the Trail of Tears ... not his finest moment."

    The relocation of Indian tribes was mostly the work of Andrew Jackson titular head of the Democrat Party. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 became law in 1831 when General Sherman was 11 years old.

    He was charged with protection of theTranscontinental Railroad which was completed after the Civil War and he was quite frustrated with the Plains Indians who were a serious hazard. That is where he uttered the phrase about "good Indians."

    There was an early opportunity for the advance tribes, like the Iroquois, to adapt the the immigrants from Europe but they made the disastrous choice to side with the French in the War of the Spanish Succession. The Wikipedia article even mentions that some tribes did adapt and were left alone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wasn't it Philip Sheridan who said that the only good Indian is a dead Indian?

      Delete
    2. I've seen it attributed to Sherman but am willing to be educated. Sherman is my idea of the best American general of all wars with the possible exception of Washington.

      Delete
    3. Actually Jackson disagreed with the removal of the indians. Jackson believed that as long as the indians agreed to have the same land rights as any man white, indian or black then they should be allowed to stay, It was the man who came after him who said they all must go and go now.

      BTW the problem was the indians demanded that they have the rights to something like 1.7 Miles per person. So that obviously wasn't going to work.

      So yea another one of those little historical oops we have turned into cannon.

      Delete
  20. This was the Dip at his finest. The Department lost a good man when you retired, Mr. Amselem.

    When I was studying for the ministry, I had a roommate from Alabama. I moved into the room first, so when he came and wanted a place to hang his stars and bars and asked where it would be good, I said, "Over my Yankee dead body." I then laughed when I saw the shock, and said, "Go ahead and hang it anywhere." After all, "we" won (even though my folks generally got hear after the guns fell silent--although one great-grandfather's sister married a veteran of a Wisconcin regiment, I believe). Later, I was puzzling over the Greek New Testament, leaned back in my chair, and brushed his flag. I asked, "Hey, what are you going to do when your flag is full of Yankee dandruff?" he said, "Wash it." We enjoyed some good-natured ribbing, but that was it.

    The man in question, BTW, was no racist, and never expressed a word of nostalgia for the peculiar institution.

    The only quibble with Dip's post is that I wouldn't go looking for grievances about things like the Baltimore coat of arms (Uncle Kepha is a Marylander), even facetiously, as is clearly the case here. The Left's so devoid of any sense of proportion that they'll tie up the courts with such things. Having been born in Noo Joysey, I'm afraid that one of these days, the Left will kick my natal state out of the union and strip me of citizenship for having been born there because NJ pre-emptively violated the Wall of Separation when the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon (Scots immigrant Presbyterian, he) singed the Declaration of Independence. [waxed facetious myself there]. I'm all for preserving whatever we can from our history, "warts and all", even if it's chapters that are not ones I'd care to celebrate.

    As far as the Charlestown shooting goes, it's telling that Roof couldn't find accomplices among his white Sothron peers. But the cynic in me thinks that had Roof been wearing a Che Guevara T-shirt and yelled, "Alllllllaaaaahhhhuuu-Akbar!", he would've made racism fashionable on the Left once more.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Finally, while I deplore racist ideology, I have come to understand street-level ethnocentrism and amour propre--and between the last two and racism there is only a fine line. I credit it to living among a supposedly more clannish portion of the Taiwanese population and finding a wife from among them. Sure, we all live with walls of prejudice around us. But these walls are ways we protect things valuable to us, and, as far as I'm concerned, if these walls have sufficient doors and windows in them, they should be allowed to stand. Those doors and windows allow us to communicate outside the boundaries of our groups and remind us we're human rather than exclusively members of Group X.

    ReplyDelete
  22. While we're discussing removing racist symbols of the past, there is a high school in Washington DC that needs a new name ... Woodrow Wilson's racist record (at his behest, his son in law, as Secretary of the Treasury, re-instituted segregation) is well known.

    See Randy Barnett's post at Instapundit this morning.

    Green Bear

    ReplyDelete
  23. I was taking you seriously on the no loyalty to a foreign entity until I noticed your "I stand with Israel" thingee. Fall with Israel, the albatross of the Empire.
    I stand only with the organic American Nation-if we can activate it when the Empire crumbles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My only loyalty is to the USA. I, however, believe we should stand by allies, such as Israel, the UK, Canada, Australia, Japan, etc. There is no conflict in holding those two views.

      Delete
    2. Basically, I agree with you about standing by allies. However, I taught a good many years in Taiwan, and am painfully aware of how the exigencies of Realpolitik--helped along by utterly unrealistic assessments of Mao's regime-- treated our relationship with that country.

      Delete
  24. Locate some photos from Wounded Knee and what will you see? Black soldiers with the Stars and Stripes. Try to find that little historical fact in any American high school text book. You won't.

    So as someone who has family listed on the Dawes Rolls, I understand that the Stars and Stripes no longer represent, to me, what it did to my ancestors. I fly it proudly on my home. Just as the Stars and Bars no longer represent to modern day Southerners what it did to those of the plantation class that tried to exercise their rights as outlined in the preamble to the Declaration of Independence.

    BAN THE CONFEDERATE FLAG is now the rallying cry of the left. Here is what I suggest we ban; all the bigotry held against anything Southern; the Southern states, the Southern people, the Southern heritage. But if we are going to go that route, as a Texan, I want the Mexican flag removed from in front of the Bob Bullock Museum in Austin. Why? We won, Mexico lost and the Mexican flag has no place in front of a publically owned museum (it's that what the talking heads are saying about the Confederate battle flag).

    I'm sick of the soft bigotry of the rest of the nation against the Southern states, and the Southern people, in particular. So while there are now those who are demanding that the movie, Gone With The Wind, be banished, I demand the movie, Deliverance, be banished. I also demand that any university or high school that uses the panther as a mascot be required to change it as the panther reminds me of the Black Panthers/New Black Panthers who are clearly racist.

    Zane

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    Replies
    1. You know that the Mexican flag represents? The Aztecs.

      At the time it was adopted, there was little else the symbols could represent beyond some rather horrific mass murders, perhaps beyond anything the Confederates did.

      If it is plausible that the Confederate battle flag caused Roof, it is plausible that the Mexican flag causes all sorts of murders.

      If it is proper to ban the Confederate flag, it is proper to ban the Mexican flag. If it is proper to remove the Confederate battle flag from memorials, because government, perhaps it is proper to expel all Mexican embassies, because government.

      Anti-Democrat

      Delete
    2. "There are plenty of other overt racialist symbols that separate Americans. One is the prominent use of La Raza, “The Race” — seen most prominently in the National Council of La Raza, an ethnic lobbying organization that has been and is currently a recipient of federal funds."

      http://www.nationalreview.com/article/420142/america-one-nation-indivisible

      Delete
  25. I've spent some time observing - no commenting at all. Well, except for here, two other places I have offered thought.

    Your post Diplomad Sir was prescient; not exclusively so but in its conciseness, compactness - "We have a Winner."
    ___________

    Reading afield I came upon a particular. The article itself not impressing (me at any rate) but I was somewhat heartened at some of the content of character in the comments.

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/politics/2015/06/the_confederate_flag_flap_is_a_distraction_from_tough_issues_of_racism.html

    ReplyDelete
  26. And always remember, you do not satisfy a hyena with a pint of blood and it is very foolish to think you will do anything more than increase its appetite.

    ReplyDelete
  27. http://www.autoblog.com/2015/06/24/confederate-flag-dukes-hazzard-license-plate/

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  28. What angered the Charleston shooter was the frequency, and brutality, of black on white crime - and the corporate media's shameless coverup of it. An honest discussion would focus on that. Instead, the media has found a scapegoat: The rebel flag.

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    Replies
    1. You have hit the nail upon its head !

      Delete
  29. Sir, it is a common misconception that the War of Northern Aggression was begun over slavery. One can only have this belief if one believes Lincoln was a liar when he said that if he could preserve the Union without freeing slaves he would have done so. Further, citizens of four states which did not secede (Kentucky, Missouri, Delaware, Maryland) were allowed to own slaves for the duration of the war. Last, the much misunderstood Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves ONLY in states that were not under Union control. This is analogous to President Obama proclaiming a tax cut for the people of Mexico. The secession was about many things, of which slavery was arguably the biggest factor but not the only one. Do some reading on the Tariff of Abominations and the Nullification Crisis of the Jackson administration, which not coincidentally happened in South Carolina.

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