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Saturday, August 29, 2015

Trump Marches On . . .

Some weekend thoughts.

There's a whole slew of presidential election polls out there, and you can believe them or not at this early point in the horrifically long US election process. One, however, does not need formal polls to know that Donald Trump has had and is having a great and unforeseen impact on American politics. In my little world in a corner of semi-rural California, I increasingly encounter people who, almost ashamed of themselves, say they "like" Trump, and, yes, they could vote for him. They admire his brashness, his, shall we say, talent at political jujitsu. The media and others hit him with their best shots, pointing out his "weaknesses,"and he turns those right around and makes the critics look foolish and out of touch. He has one of the oddest campaigns around--I doubt he has spent much at all--with little to no formal structure, for now, and built almost solely around Trump's celebrity status and his ability to draw the media's attention wherever he goes. The sophisticates, including the stale GOP establishment, can seek to label his pronouncements as a new nativism, perhaps try to paint him as a new Huey long, or even as a new Father Coughlin. Sure. Go ahead. It probably won't work. He has tapped into a great ignored anger and angst among the people who form the base of this nation.

Let me be blunt. I do not want a Democrat elected President in 2016. I would vote for ANY of the Republican candidates over ANY of the Democratic candidates. That said, my own personal jury is still out on whether Trump is the best candidate to ensure that the horrid Democratic party is denied the White House.

In addition, I just don't know what Trump genuinely believes. He, for now, doesn't seem to have any sort of well-developed plan beyond reading the headlines on the Drudge Report and feeding off of them. Could he work with Congress? Could he develop an administration with coherent policies? Is there more to Trump than just Trump? I don't know. He doesn't seem to have any deep knowledge of foreign affairs, certainly no understanding of the complexity of international trade--New import tariffs, really?--and his domestic policy seems all over the place, including calls for higher taxes on hedge fund managers--More taxes, really? I haven't seen any plans for cutting government waste and overreach, or for how to handle Russia, China, Iran, ISIS, etc.  But, no matter, the appeal of Trump is there.

As I said above, I want the Dems out of the White House. If Trump can do that, good. My concern, however, is whether Trump has the legs to make it all the way to November 2016. Will his schtick grow tiresome? If Trump is going to implode or explode, then I want him to do it now or very soon. If he self-destroys, I want him to do it while there is still time to get somebody else out there. Right now nobody else is getting a message or image through the Trump chaff. If, however, he does not blow up or collapse or run out of steam in the next six to eight months, or so, then I want him to go the distance.

Back to my cars and my dogs . . .

Ain't nobody touching this car . . .

44 comments:

  1. Trump has written several books; if you want to know where he stands, the first thing to do is read those books. Amazon has them. For a look at his plan to achieve the Presidency- yes, he does have one, and it's working just great!- you may want to check out The Conservative Treehouse:

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/

    The GOPe plan is discussed there too; needless to say, Donald Trump has blown that plan out of the water; good riddance! (Well, unless you're really a fan of Democrat Lite policies.)

    Go Trump! Make America Great Again!

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    Replies
    1. What are the names of the ghostwriters? Or is that not public information yet?

      Delete
    2. Gee, I don't know, a6z. Who writes your comments?

      I really don't know why you posted that. It doesn't reflect well upon you.

      Delete
    3. I am grief-stricken that you feel that way, Eskyman.

      My comments are written by a cabal of illuminati, and edited by the Pope, the Queen of England, and the Chief Rabbi of Israel (Orthodox).

      I am expressing doubt that the Donald would write a book rather than pay to have it done. I doubt that he could write a coherent book, either--he can't seem to speak a coherent sentence. I am sorry that that was insufficiently clear.

      I do approve of his strong objection to illegal immigration. As Ann Coulter points out, there is also a big problem with legal immigration (under the 1965 law). And also of his strong objection to "political correctness," which, however, he seems to confuse with common courtesy. That's as far as I can go towards outright approval.

      Delete
    4. Sundance wants to destroy the Republican party because it is the same as the Democratic party. All the nominee's have been bought and paid for. With the exception of Trump.

      Delete
  2. What do I most dislike about the Democrats? The lawless Caesarism.

    So if it's Trump, it's going to come down to what I second-most-dislike about them versus what I second-most-dislike about him.

    What I second-most-dislike about the Democrats is that they are the party of ever-more-government-and-less-freedom at home and of ever-less-power-abroad-and-less-national-security.

    I don't think the Donald can be as quite bad as they in that department, so if he gets the Republican nomination I'll vote for him--holding my nose, as the expression is.

    But it would be nice if he said or did something to make that a safer bet.

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  3. Your spam filter is causing trouble.

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  4. Dog is thinking: Which do you like more, me or this car?

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    Replies
    1. I'm thinking "where is all the other stuff that should be in garage?"

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  5. The sense I get of things is that Trumps support comes from republicans who no longer trust the GOP, at all. In fact they view the GOP as likely to betray them on a host of issues and promises, and with good reason. The old argument of "but the democrats will win..." no longer has any weight with them, as the GOP all too often sides with the democrats against the GOP voter base. Trumps specific policies or experience are utterly irrelevant to them, he opposes the GOP loudly and publicly and so he is their man even if his ideas for government are no different than a typical Dem..

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    Replies
    1. Trump's appeal is partly that he is running on his own money, and seems less beholden to the organized interests who fund other polticians. He is willing to be himself, and voters like that after being treated to parades of what seem to be front men for interests--Jumboes fronting for corporations and Jackasses for groups of activists eager to get their hands on more tax money.

      Delete
    2. Campaigning certainly should be easier when one doesn't have very carefully "talk around" issues important to large donors. It's not that these large donors would not support a candidate simply because he/she tread upon their interests in campaign claims, but they're perhaps not going to write that early check that would help the campaign out.
      A billion dollars means little care for that kind of calculus and a much better spoken candidate.

      - reader #1482

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    3. Yes, but not only--perhaps not especially--from Republicans, or rather not from people who consider themselves to be Republicans between elections. And similarly, mutatis mutandis, for Sanders Democrats.

      After all, the "betrayal" of Republican principle they claim to fear, he is proud to announce he is unafraid to consider--except in the case of illegal immigration. In fact, betrayal of Republican principle on trade is now a big part of his ... program, if "program" is the word I want.

      I grant that he is more nearly correct than the actual Republicans on illegal immigration. At least as to tone.

      Delete
  6. Let's see a bit more of the Caddy.

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  7. Which Caddy? Mrs Dip's or Obambies?

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  8. From one of my previous comments:

    "I love what Trump is doing to the RINO's think he would make a great vice-president taking flak (you don't draw enemy fire unless you are over target) while Scott Walker (as president) was dismantling half the bureaucracy."

    It's a strange world where people question Trump's government acumen while ignoring the halfrican's total lack of acumen, negotiating skills, ability to get along with congress, lack of common-sense or even his ability to put in a seven-hour workday five days a week.

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    Replies
    1. I can't speak for other people questioning Trump's government acumen, but I do it while ignoring Obama's frightfulness because Obama isn't running for the 2016 GOP nomination.

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    2. 1. Obama isn't running for GOP in 2016.
      2. Even if he were, we would still have a deep bench, and could do better.
      3. Obama's qualities directly pertain to my desire that the next President will have been a Governor. Not a Senator, not a Secretary, not a Vice President, and not a businessman; a Governor.
      4. Politically speaking, I oppose the Democratic Party. Fighting the Democrats in the future may involve allying with people who have voted Democrat in the past. Some of them even Obama voters. People can change, people can change in four years. However, I am deeply concerned with Trump's ties to the Democratic Party, the Clintons, and support for their agenda. Among other things, I think his liberal background blinds him to parts of Obama's mess.

      If he doesn't see it, he won't fix it. If he doesn't fix it, the American people may see it as unfixable, or also blame the Republicans. This potentially could prevent future attempts at fixing things.
      5. I remain suspicious that the Clintons incited both Trump and Perot.

      Anti-Democrat

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    3. I think you understand the point I was making, but if you want to be obtuse, strike through "halfrican" and substitute Hillary Clinton.

      And while we are talking jokers, Kanye for Potus, Kim for Flotus 2020-oh my! Serious contenders need never apply, it seems to be a twitter universe presidency now.

      Delete
  9. You don't need a dog to guard a car. Friends in the East End (of London) found that a very aggressive neighbourhood squirrel did a fine job of deterring intruders. Probably it wouldn't live as long, but maybe it would sire a whole pack of killer squirrels.

    Does Trump correspond to an aggressive squirrel, and the Caddy to the USA?

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  10. It seems that Ben Carson, a physician, is gaining on The Donald. Again, I suspect this shows a kind of weariness with Politics-and-Polticians-as-usual. Carson's Alger-esque personal history also has appeal.

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  11. It is not just Republicans that like Sir Donald of Trump. Many plain old Democrats are still around --those who are not Lefties, Commie Libs etc. Part of this Trump show is coming from our never ending political campaigns with presidential cycles beginning so early and lasting so long.

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  12. Trump has pulled the sword from the stone. Maybe Cruz can be his Merlin.

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. I wasn't too syre about Trump until I read his comments regarding Pamela Geller. While her brashness (Mr Trump?) turns some off, as a Jew I find her willingness to speak truth to power especially with regards to Islam very refreshing.
    Trump will not be getting my vote.

    ReplyDelete
  15. How will I become convinced Trump's not just performing a PR stunt for a new TV show? He flirted with this before... why would I take him seriously now? He's got nothing to lose really, so if he bails at the last minute, he 'just' goes back to being a billionaire.
    I dunno.. he's appeared fickle in the past, so he's got some convincing to do.

    - reader #1482

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  16. I have the nagging suspicion of the '92 scenario: Loud-mouthed millionaire goes third party, Clinton wins.

    That said, I'd vote for any GOP candidate over a Dem.

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    Replies
    1. Dunno... I'd vote for Huckabee or Christie over at least some of the GOP candidates. :)

      - reader #1482

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  17. "Ain't nobody touching this ca...Wait. Izzat a cookie?"

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  18. The answer

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/07/13/why-i-support-donald-trumps-campaign-and-its-probably-not-what-you-think/

    ReplyDelete
  19. You still don’t get it, do you,? He’ll find them! That’s what he does! That’s ALL he does! You can’t stop him! He’ll go through you like a hot knife through french butter, reach down the GOP Establishment’s throat and pull their damn lungs out! Listen and understand! The Trumpinator is now here! He can’t be bought. He can’t be intimidated. He can’t be bamboozled. He doesn’t bow to political correctness and he doesn’t feel fear. And he absolutely will not stop, ever, until the GOP Establishment, is dead.

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    Replies
    1. That's what some people said about Perot. As Lewis said, "If Trump can do that, good. My concern, however, is whether Trump has the legs to make it all the way to November 2016."

      I'm not going to go "Full Fanboy" on Trump though. I will vote for him if it comes down to him or the Democrats (full on socialists).
      leaperman

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    2. Bingo, that needs to happen. Many Independents have left the GOP due to its move to the far right. Most of the crazies in the House that have become obstructionists come from highly gerrymandered districts with no fear of elections.Our government was not designed to work with representatives going to Washington and taking the "my way or the highway,no compromise attitude".Yes we do need a VERY DRASTIC CHANGE.

      Delete
    3. all one has to do is wonder why the F-35 program will not die. Because they split it up among 48 plus states. Every politician has a finger in the pie. Not what is good for the nation...only what is locally good for them.
      leaperman

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  20. You need to consider the view of Scott Adams, who writes the "Dilbert" cartoon. He argues that Trump's approach to politics should be seen in terms of a skilled businessman trying to land a deal:
    http://blog.dilbert.com/post/127479255236/trump-vs-bush-persuasion-wars

    Once you look at Trump in those terms, as a salesman competing with other salesmen in a market and using all the known psychological tricks of selling, his behaviour makes sense.

    ReplyDelete
  21. A bit off-centre Bob but in the light of your recent acquisitions I am reminded of PJ O'Rourke's associate Joe Schenkman's reportage from the 1980 Republican Convention where he was pleased to report that "Mighty Mid-60s Mopar Muscle Cars" still rule the roads of downtown Detroit. That description comes to mind everytime I've seen one since; they're still relatively rare Down Under. Enjoy.

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  22. Trump's entry in the nomination game is beautiful. He is in the process of exposing all the wannabees,controlled by the varied money interest. The man knows the game, having played it all his life. He is not intimidated by his peers or the press. If he takes IA,NH,SC there should be no stopping him. If he takes the nomination or runs third party makes little difference, the result will be the destruction of the GOP as we now know it(in reality the party is in the process of destroying itself). Only good can come out of this scenario. Maybe a new party(without so cons and far right) will rise from the ashes that support the people and not the one percent and corporations.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Trump's entry in the nomination game is beautiful. He is in the process of exposing all the wannabees,controlled by the varied money interest. The man knows the game, having played it all his life. He is not intimidated by his peers or the press. If he takes IA,NH,SC there should be no stopping him. If he takes the nomination or runs third party makes little difference, the result will be the destruction of the GOP as we now know it(in reality the party is in the process of destroying itself). Only good can come out of this scenario. Maybe a new party(without so cons and far right) will rise from the ashes that support the people and not the one percent and corporations.

    ReplyDelete
  24. OK, maybe I'm crazy, but it seems to me that Trump is the mirror image of Hugo Chavez. Not in terms of thuggery, but rather in the way he taps so effectively into the antipathy of a lot of people toward the Powers-That-Be. Those people want Something Done, and they don't care how it's done. (And that, in turn, is at least a partial mirror image of Obama's electoral successes.)
    I suspect -- and hope -- that the Donald will say or do something before too long that will make his off-the-cuff vacuousness apparent even to his supporters. I mean, really, is this a thoughtful candidate or just someone who makes the right vague statements that rile people up? The people are rightfully riled up, but they deserve someone who can actually close the deal. And contrary to his enthusiasts, Trump can't close the deal. Ultimately, he's just a bulls----er with superficial answers to serious questions.

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    1. Or, you might call it painting with broad strokes which is as it should be at this point in a campaign. He is concerned with immigration, trade deals and interaction with allies. The election is 14 months out and he has plenty of time to refine these messages. But for now, he has hit a vein in the American electorate; on the left and the right regarding immigration, trade and the shabby treatment our current admin has given to our staunch allies.. I say let him run.

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    2. I agree, he has no equal in the lame group running against him for the nomination, they are the usual type of politicians that Americans have come to dislike.The other two non politicians have absolutely no chance of going anywhere, one with no management experience of any kind / the other outsourced thousands of jobs and was a business failure-fired. Again has no equal in the party,as nominee he will pick up some Dems and Independents like myself.

      Delete
  25. They never saw Trump coming.
    ♦ Following The Money
    ♦ The GOPe Roadmap
    ♦ The Roles of The Players – “The Splitters”
    ♦ How each candidate is aligned in the Roadmap
    ♦ Arrow #1 Trump Hits The Super-PACs – The GOPe Achilles Heel
    ♦ Arrow #2 Trump Hits Bush – Inside The Wall Street Fortress
    ♦ Arrow #3 Trump Cuts Off Rubio/Bush switch – The GOPe Switch
    ♦ The Rick Perry Tripwire Exposed – DC Super-Pac
    ♦ Jeb Bush Super-Pac Will immediately spend $10 Million
    ♦ Proving there is only one political party in Washington DC
    ♦ Why Support Trump – Part One (The GOPe Ruse)
    ♦ Why Support Trump – Part Two (Stop being played)
    ♦ Why Support Trump – Part Three (Intellectual Details)
    ♦ How To Defeat the GOPe Road Map
    ♦ Current Polling Exposes – the Ohio, Florida, Texas, Virginia, New York Splitters

    http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2015/09/01/rush-limbaugh-recognizes-the-gope-splitter-strategy/#more-105585

    ReplyDelete
  26. Nice wheels on that car. Is the white lettering on the tires raised? All you need now is an eight track inside. Ah, for the days where signposts at every intersection were wrapped with 8 track tape fluttering in the wind.
    James the Lesser

    ReplyDelete