Featured Post

Leftist Savagery Continues

On May 1, I posted a piece "commemorating" the 100 days of leftist savagery that we had seen since President Trump's inaugura...

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Makers & Payers vs. Takers & Players

Back in 2011, I wrote a piece about the battle between voters and taxpayers. I noted then that,
the real source of the crises facing the major currencies, and, in fact, our core economic well-being . . . comes down to a very simple and basic fact. The western nations have developed societies where those who pay for government services, in general, are not the ones benefitting from the services. In the United States, for example, we have the top one percent of earners paying 38-41% of all Federal income tax. We have nearly half of Americans who pay no income tax, and another large percentage 15-20% who pay minimal income tax (and lets not even get into "Earned Income Tax Credits".) We essentially have a society where some 25% of the income earners pay close to 90% of all Federal income taxes. That 25% does not consume anywhere near 90% of the services provided by the Feds.
The 2016 elections in the US showed that this battle certainly proved the case, again. Look at the electoral map, especially by counties, and you will see the country is awash in a tide of red; the Democrat strongholds of blue are little islands in a vast sea of Republican red. The Founding Fathers, in their great wisdom, designed our electoral college system to ensure that all parts of the country had a voice and that there would be limitations on the "tyranny of the majority."

According to the liberal media, of course, the majority, as represented by the popular vote, is actually Democratic, with Hillary winning the popular vote by perhaps a million votes. Irrelevant for a number of reasons. We, first of all, do not have direct election of the president, and it is unfortunate that the schools no longer teach the Constitution. There are, in addition, many electoral systems around the world where the popular vote does not directly translate into political power, including in most parliamentary systems. Even well-established and "democratic" parliamentary systems do not have direct election of the head of government, so we are not alone in that. Second, as noted, the electoral college system was meant as a brake on regional or urban majorities from being able to impose their will across our vast and very diverse country. Third, we might note, a typical Republican voter is more likely to be representing a family than many of the urban Democratic voters. Last, we might note, that there are some vigorous investigations underway, e.g. here, that are demonstrating what many of us have known all along (see here and here, for example): the Democrats launched a massive voter fraud effort for the 2016 elections, including having the President urge aliens to vote without fear of consequences. It seems that easily some three million votes were cast for Hillary by non-citizens, and nobody knows yet how many millions of dead voters weighed in for the Democratic candidate--all that, of course, in addition to the Democrats' usual drive to have multiple voting. I believe we could easily deduct some five to six million votes from Hillary's total.

All that, however, is irrelevant to the point of today's post: The red areas, overwhelmingly, are the parts of the country that actually make and grow things. These are the makers and the payers. Their energy and creativity support the blue takers and players. As we see in the anti-Trump riots now sputtering along in various parts of the country, and sure to make appearances at the inauguration ceremonies in DC next January, the people doing the rioting and breaking and playing around, obviously, have no jobs to worry about or families to support.

If President Trump keeps faith with those makers and payers, he will be a great president.


36 comments:

  1. Hillary isn't president.

    President Elect Donald Trump will have to screw up mightily to erase that credit from the ledger.

    -Blake

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, it's even better than that, Blake: Hillary will NEVER be president. This nations owes Trump a debt it can never repay, just for that alone.

      Delete
    2. Consider it a typo on my part and yes, you're correct.

      "Hillary will never be president" never gets old, does it?

      -Blake

      Delete
    3. I hope someone somewhere is working on a mirror world chronicle, depicting each day what would be happening if Hillary had won. Let's see, today there would be cabinet announcements. Tony Podesta for Secretary of State?

      Delete
  2. "The last time Democrats were this mad at Republicans was when the Republicans abolished slavery and let black people vote."

    ReplyDelete
  3. Every American with whom I've discussed the subject, be he Dem or GOP, has agreed that the Dems get a large advantage from vote cheating. Why has the GOP done nothing effective about it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In part, it is due to the consent degree the GOP agreed to in the early 80's, after their attempts to ensure a clean vote in a New Jersey election were decreed to be voter intimidation.

      Delete
    2. Political cowardice, then?

      Delete
    3. To bring up electoral fraud immediately opens one to charges of racism. So, yes, the Republicans have been cowards on this as have the local, state, and federal authorities -- when, that is, those authorities have not been involved in the fraud, themselves.

      Delete
  4. Hell, in CA it is voter intimidation to have a reminder sign that you must be a citizen to vote in sight of a polling place.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This may be the conservative movements last chance for 50 years to try to clean up this ballot stuffing problem. If Trump leaves office without a remedy in place, this country is toast ... at least until Hispanics realize that they are conservatives too.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Also, in most counties, the military and absentee vote is not counted unless the election is close enough for those votes to make a difference. Those votes are historically about 60% Republican. So, there's another couple million votes to add to Trump's total

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually, they are counted but not on election night and the winner is declared if the margin is too large for the result to change. The absentee and overseas military votes are eventually counted but it can take several weeks for the tally to be updated. Still you are right that there may yet be a change in the margin of popular votes for Hilary.

      Fortunately, the electoral college numbers won't change.

      There are, of course, calls by the losers (usually Democrats)for the electors to be 'unfaithful' and vote Hillary anyway. While it is constitutionally possible, this is very unlikely to succeed as history shows these calls happen regularly and always go nowhere. The constitutional crisis that would trigger would be dreadful.

      Delete
  7. A favorite writer of mine, Neville Shute, who is a conservative writer of great novels (He died in 1960 but still has a worldwide fan base) once wrote an attempt to predict the future called, "In the Wet." In it he fantasizes about many things he would like to see happen One if them was a voting system in which an individual had more than one vote based on contributions to society. Military service gave an extra vote and so on. It was, of course, fantasy but an interesting idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dangerous idea ... because the criteria for extra votes becomes a political football. Remember Lannie Guinere, the attempted SCOTUSer, who thought blacks should get more than one vote?

      Delete
    2. Shute wasn't being particularly creative with that idea. Before 1948 I'd have had four votes in a British general election - one for me at my home address, one for my business, and one each for my two universities.

      Delete
  8. Yeah, Mark Twain's The Curious Republic of Gondour is in this vein also.
    http://www.nitrosyncretic.com/rah/gondour.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I looked up the 7 votes on wikipedia. Just image trying to enforce such an arrangement nowadays!

      Delete
  9. "some three million votes were cast for Hillary by non-citizens"

    Snoped: http://www.snopes.com/three-million-votes-in-presidential-election-cast-by-illegal-aliens/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snopes has about the same amount of credibility as the NY Times.

      It's a pity Snopes destroyed their credibility through being partisan hacks.

      -Blake

      Delete
    2. I can remember when Snopes wasn't as partisan as it has become. I remember recently reading about Hillary laghing about getting the rapist of the12 year old girl off with a light sentence. They called it "mostly false" but from the body of their own explanation you could tell that it was "mostly true".

      Delete
  10. Somebody recently posted judge Posner's article after the 2012 election from Slate, which gave 5 politically neutral reasons why the electoral college was superior to a direct popular vote. I thought his best reasons were certainty of outcome, avoiding electoral disputes, and avoiding the need for run-off elections.


    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/view_from_chicago/2012/11/defending_the_electoral_college.html#return1

    ReplyDelete
  11. ...the electoral college also limits (not thought of by the framers of the Constitution)the effect of voter fraud...it only influences the results of one state with the electoral college, not like a popular vote..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. North Carolina is one such State adversely affected by dead voters, illegal alien voters, and some 90,000 ballots in one batch alone of questionable validity. The governor's race is close at some 5,300 votes for the democrat but the voter fraud may well negate his "popular" vote.

      Delete
  12. Mattis! Everyone yell it out! (squeeeeeeeeeeeee!)

    On Saturday, Trump plans to meet with retired Gen. James Mattis, a contender to lead the Pentagon. Mattis would require a congressional waiver to serve as defense secretary because he has not been out of uniform for the required minimum of seven years.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Since we've all been wargaming Trump's cabinet picks, what say our esteemed host about whom he'd like to see as Secretary of State?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Trump's election has given us a chance. Let's hope we don't blow it.

    Good picks so far by the Trump transition team.

    AND over at AOS someone submitted our host W. Lewis Amselem as SoS. :) Kudos!




    pmc

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The world has gone mad, I tell, you, mad!

      Delete
  15. Elevator music in the Trump Tower:
    https://youtu.be/4Gon8_V0wb8
    James the Lesser

    ReplyDelete
  16. I read some of the German press every day, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Die Welt, and Der Spiegel, and so far their Trump Derangement Syndrome is waxing rather than waning. Quite a few commenters on the websites do understand the real story, but it is still concerning. They have all adopted the "racist" claim from the US MSM, among other things. I'm afraid the real reason is that for the German media, discerning and telling the truth about the US is less satisfying than virtue signalling and anti-American posing. Probably true of our MSM also.

    ReplyDelete
  17. On the whole you are correct about the "Makers and the takers". Still, thanks to the huge profit margin in software wages in these areas have gone through the roof. Subsequently, California is one of the places that sends the most money back to the Feds via income tax. Strangely enough, this doesn't seem to bother the billionaires who have built here and expect to remain in spite of the fact their employees spend their wages on million dollar flop houses to live in.

    ReplyDelete
  18. We will hear much more about how Trump is a climate denier and Soros and ANSWER will be in the streets for the next 4 years, IMO. Having been a protester many times since I was 19, I fully support and admire the 1st Amendment for all citizens regardless of ideology, however I managed to avoid any confrontations with law enforcement over those 53 years, so I have zero tolerance for violence in protests. I fully support throwing the book at those who do, if for nothing else than to fully preserve the rights of peaceful citizens from infringement by irrational laws on citizens' 1st Amendment rights.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hillary didn't win a majority of the vote. So the crybabies need to stop whining.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Well, I had a good time, now to settle down. These people aren't going away and some of the fiercest and dirtiest fights are yet to come. Trump needs to plan ahead, articulate strongly a counter-vision and take visible steps to implement it (trusting the support he has). But he also must pay attention to every step, for instance, the Electoral College. He needs to insure his victory there on Dec 11th I think. Then prepare for Inauguration Day, which being high profile publicity wise will be a moment the left will attempt to co-opt. After that legislation, de-regulation, and revamping the entire bureaucracy (with Congressional help).
    Basically, make sure of the beginning without getting too bogged down and be relentless.
    James the Lesser

    ReplyDelete
  21. Everybody remembers how strong that "Occupy Wall Street" movement remained through the cold Winter months.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Diplomad,

    End this madness (Romney?) going on for the SoS position and put you hat in the ring. I'm sure you have connections that can get Trump's ear.

    ReplyDelete