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Saturday, February 11, 2017

The New Mexican War

Much has been written, including in this blog, of the threat to America posed by radical Islamic terrorism. Not so much has been written about another threat, perhaps an even greater one. I refer to the threat posed by Mexico to the United States; it is multi-faceted and persistent, and forms a long established core component of Mexico's foreign policy.

Before I get into the subject let me engage in the usual disclaimer required in our snowflake culture. I have been in Mexico many times both on vacation and for work as a US diplomat. I know Mexico well, am fascinated by its history, and consider Mexico City one of the great cities in the world. If you want outstanding restaurants and, above all, world class museums and other cultural institutions, go to Mexico City.

That said, I also have long considered Mexico a major threat to America. I have dealt with Mexican diplomats at the UN, the OAS, and in Central and South America. They are first rate. They are patriotic, well-trained, dedicated, and hard working. They, almost to a man and a woman, are also possessed with a deep, deep animus towards the United States. At the UN and the OAS, for example, Mexico, in my experience, played the role of opponent to whatever we sought to do. They not only consistently voted against us, they collaborated with our opponents on resolutions and projects antithetical to our interests, and, for example, refused to oppose Cuban and Venezuelan human rights violations. They rarely passed on an opportunity to stick it in our eye.

Mexico had a major role in fostering guerrilla groups in Central America during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, backing off only when it became a hindrance to the NAFTA deal with the United States, and when some of the groups began operating in Mexico. Mexico is feared and resented throughout Central America as a bully and for its mistreatment of Central American migrants. The horror stories these migrants tell of their passage through Mexico are hair-raising and heartbreaking.

I wrote during the recent hysteria over Russian hacking and interference in our  2016 elections that,
Is there foreign interference in our elections? You bet. 
The biggest offender? Not Russia, but Mexico. Mexican officials publicly called on Mexicans in the US to oppose Trump; Mexico's over fifty--yes, fifty--consulates in the US (here) are hot beds of political activity and activism. Millions of illegal and legal aliens largely from Mexico and Central America vote, yes vote. We need to have an in-depth investigation into Mexico's interference in our elections, an interference that goes well beyond revealing embarrassing DNC texts. 
There. That's an investigation the GOP should endorse, and the new SecState should take up the issue of Mexican interference in our elections.
That interference in our politics has not ceased since the elections. It, in fact, has increased. Some years ago, I mentioned to a senior colleague in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs at State, my concern over the openly political activity engaged in by Mexico's consulates and diplomatic personnel in the U.S. She acknowledged it was a problem but not one anybody wanted to take up.  Well, it is now at a stage when it must be taken up. If the Trump administration is serious about protecting our borders and sovereignty the time has come for tough action on Mexico.

We see this story in the Wall Street Journal (and here) in which Mexican officials, including their diplomats in the US, are seeking to "jam" US courts with contested deportations. The Mexican government has set aside millions of dollars to help illegal Mexican migrants in the US fight efforts to deport them. In addition, Mexico, apparently, is contemplating the grotesque tactic of demanding that we PROVE that deportees are Mexican citizens before Mexico will accept them. In other words, we have to provide the documentation that Mexico failed to provide its own citizens. Mexican officials are holding meetings in Arizona with US politicians warning them about the harm to US-Mexico relations if illegal aliens are deported or prevented from coming to the US. Mexican officials are openly encouraging activists to block deportations. I find this nothing short of outrageous, but, nevertheless, a clear manifestation of the hostility that has long existed in Mexican officialdom for the USA.

We must not only defend our border but, in my view, it is well past the time for the US to begin shutting down most of these Mexican consulates. There is no justification for Mexico to have over fifty consulates in the US. Had I the power, we would give Mexico one week to close 25-30 consulates. In addition, we would work out a plan to close additional consulates depending on how Mexico behaves. If Mexico, in fact, refuses to take back deportees, then we would need to take additional actions such as shutting down our visa issuance in Mexico, kicking out their ambassador from Washington, closing down the border crossing for periods of time, and even halting remittances to Mexico--just to let Mexico feel the pain. As part, of course, of any comprehensive reform of our immigration laws, no federal money should go to supporting illegal aliens in the US.

The Southwest USA does not "belong" to Mexico. Mexico, please note, held California for about 25 years; they had Texas for even less time. Spain held the area for a couple hundred years, and we've had it for some 170 years. So enough with that argument. It is tiresome.

The USA has the right to defend its sovereignty and borders. Mexicans have no right of access to the US any more than anybody else does.

63 comments:

  1. Can we just stop pandering to Mexico? How much money do we have to invest for the comfort of those who invade our land? My own idea is to change the current law. Citizenship is not offered if the parent is here illegally. Rid ourselves of the anchor-baby plague.

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    Replies
    1. Too Late... Mexico now controls California, Texas, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico. All without having to shoot a single shot. The US IS falling apart from the inside out, all due to its lust of MONEY.

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  2. Yes, let's close down most of their consulates, ship illegals back to Mexico and tell them to fix their own country/economy instead of relying on workers here sending back remittances. http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/02/10/514172676/mexicans-in-the-u-s-are-sending-home-more-money-than-ever

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  3. AND, let us not forget the Extra Child Tax Credit, a "refundable credit" which means that you can get it well in excess of the tax you paid. People who have dependents in Mexico, get an ITIN for them and the US Treasury sends them a check.

    There is a huge building in Austin TX, separate from the IRS Service Center, entirely devoted to issuing Individual Taxpayer Identity Numbers. If the bill currently before the Congress passes, and these dependents, real and imaginary, must be actual residents with actual Social Security numbers, several billion dollars a year would cease flowing into Mexico.

    I do see some advantages to the program: Dependents stay in Mexico, and their ECTC checks pay for their education and health care in Mexico, at Mexican prices, rather than being smuggled into el Norte, where we still pay for the education and health care, but at US prices. However, we do not need to continue this program indefinitely. The Mexican intellectuals I have met are steeped, as Europeans are, and, more and more, of course, American students, in Quasi-Marxist cant, the assumption that their problems are caused by American exploitation.

    The nationalization of petroleum in 1937, paid for with token sums, did not enrich Mexico. Rather, it cut Mexico off from any investment in its other oil fields, making it impossible, for decades, to bring in other wells.

    Their corruptocrat government, of whichever party, will always blame Mexican poverty on colonialism, as such people do all over the world. They will also exploit the ignorance of their people about other matters. People from Brazil, Argentina, and other former "borges" nations see it as a basic fact of life that Mexico has an inferior education system that makes the people more governable. There exists a pyramid of snobbery, with Argentina at the top, and poor Mexico at the base.

    Spanish television news leans more sharply Leftward than even the Communist News Network, never referring to "illegal immigrants" always just to "immigrants". You can bet that the manipulation will continue, but the flow could be slowed, and present immigration law could be enforced.

    Michael Adams

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  4. No mention of all the drugs coming in from Mexico and all the money flowing back under the wing of many pols? How about $22 billion at one drug lord's lair itself? See: http://fletchcast.blogspot.com/2014/02/makes-world-go-around.html. (I haven't yet figured out the hypertext mark-up translation lesson.) Of course much of the blame goes to us ... those of us who need opeates to get through life. Perhaps Trump is right and we need a modern-day opium war ... since Mexico seems to pay only lip service to this plague.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just didn't have time. I have gone over a lot of that in prior posts. I was outraged beyond belief by the latest overt stunt by the GOM to threaten to collapse our court system if we tried to enforce our laws.

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    2. The plague is by design.

      “Whose interests are served by the drug war? The U.S. government enforces a drug cartel. The major beneficiaries from drug prohibition are the drug lords, who can maintain a cartel that they would be unable to maintain without current government policy.” - - Milton Friedman

      We have two choices - a drug problem or a drug + crime problem. We learned that from Alcohol Prohibition. Didn't we?

      Any one who supports Prohibition supports the gangsters. Remember that the next time you vote.

      "The Latin American drug cartels have stretched their tentacles much deeper into our lives than most people believe. It's possible they are calling the shots at all levels of government." - William Colby, former CIA Director, 1995

      Not too long after making that statement he died in a boating accident.

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  5. Maybe we should scrap our outmoded immigration codes, and adopt theirs.

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  6. "We stole it fair and square", as was originally said about the Panama Canal Zone, seems to me to be a usefully accurate description of how the US came by Spanish/Mexican territory. Of course it in now American, but you might as well be frank about why it is. Do you think that Frenchmen deny that Louis XIV stole Alsace and Lorraine fair and square from the Holy Roman Empire?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. War and Peace require your attention, and note they have different outcomes and legalities.

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    2. You might be interested in hearing how their came to be so many English speakers in Texas. It seems that the Spanish were having a problem in the waste land to their north, with the Comanche, who had discovered the horse, and thus become a menace to health and safety. They invited in some Scots-Irish settlers, well known fighters, among themselves and against various Indigenous . Documents in the archives in Mexico City record the plan, later taken up by the newly independent Mexican government, to use these settlers, and then, when they had dealt with the Comanche, raise taxes on them and drive them out. About the time that the Mexican government started to do that, Santa Ana came to power in Mexico, and revolts broke out in several Northern Mexican states, all of them suppressed, brutally, except the Texicans, who were just as good at fighting Mexicans as they were at fighting Comanche.

      The Texicans could not afford proper artillery, but sympathizers in new Orleans had donated two cannon, named the Twin Sisters. At 1400, on the afternoon of the 21st of April, 1836, as the Mexican army took its siesta on the plain of San Jacinto, behind a makeshift barricade of baggage and saddles, the Twin Sisters fired a volley, of broken up hinges and horse shoes, and the Texicans charged out from behind their own barricade, at the edge of the woods bordering the plain.

      Shouting, "Remember the Alamo, Remember Goliad" these eighteen hundred frontiers men charged into the mexican camp, and defeated the fourth largest army in the world in that day, thus securing the blessings of Liberty to themselves and their posterity, including me.

      That's how I learned it. That's how I teach it to my grand children. If I live long enough, it's how I'll teach it to my great grand children, and, if I am already promoted to Glory, it's how my son will teach tham.

      Michael Adams

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    3. texas vs mexico was one of the more lopsided underdog victories in history... impressive and innovative tactics.
      haven't read about it in a couple of years, so that's my 'general recollection'.
      sadly, Texas may be in that position again.

      - reader #1482

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  7. Some obnservations:

    Mexico uses El Norte as a safety valve. Too many Mexicans? Ship 'em northward. Need money? Get remittances! I'm not entirely against remittances. When I worked in Taiwan, I sent money home; but, Taiwan isn't exactly flooding us with low-skill illegals.

    Further, I believe somebody ought to insist on making a distinction between legal immigrants and undocumented aliens. This is a failure in current discourse that angers me no end.

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    Replies
    1. Pete, I certainly know the difference. The Texans of Spanish descent who support better border control know the difference. Univision, apparently, does not, always referring to "Immigrantes" never to "Ilegales."

      Michael Adams

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    2. vallejo tried his best to talk mexico into pursuing union with the US... but pride was on the line...

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    3. You are spot-on Kepha!

      Delete
  8. Pretty much what Michael A said, regarding the history of Anglo and Tejano settlement in Texas. Another element was that Mexico at that time had a split between Centralists (old-school, authoritarian, rule-from-the-top-down) and Federalists (more liberal in the old sense, a decentralized federation of Mexican states based more on the US model.) Santa Ana had been a Federalist for many years - but turned his coat once he had gotten power, abrogated the Mexican Constitution of 1824, persecuted his former Federalist allies - and brutally squashed those Mexican states which - like Texas - had also rebelled. Texas was the only one of them who made their rebellion stick. And for the ten years of the Republic of Texas there was a cold and vicious border war going on. Santa Ana did not admit defeat, even when forced to sign a peace treaty, the treacherous bastard.

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  9. It's funny how little things can get us down, beyond what the big ones can do. Texans still splutter with rage about Santa Ana's silver chamber pot.I have no proof that this is even true, but people swear it is, and grow disgusted all over again, every time the subject arises.

    We also learned in school that, when Santa Ana's arm had to be amputated, it was given a government funeral, whether this was true or not, I cannot say.

    Santa Ana's speech, on taking over absolute power, said that Mexico needed a benevolent dictator, a 'caudillo,' and he was volunteering for the job.

    Celia, my sentiments, precisely! The story of Goliad is enough to earn him a name forever remembered in infamy.

    It is noteworthy that Mexico, having been essentially conquered by the Centralist/Caudillo faction, has seen a steady stream of immigration to the place that successfully escaped the benevolent despotism.

    Yeah, Texans, even transplants like Celia, get quite passionate about Mexican tyranny, and don't get an immigrant started on the subject of the PRI!

    ReplyDelete
  10. As an Apache Indio, I can say this. None of you belong here, so get out!

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    Replies
    1. The Navajos were here a thousand years or more before Apaches so they would say "Get out !"

      Delete
    2. This is a common meme used by Mexican's in the argument. That the US is a product of Euro-Colonialism so the Natives (Mexicans) should have Rights to the Southwest.
      That argument falls to shreds when I remind them that unless they are descended from the exterminated Aztecs (the very few who are persecuted by the Mexican Government today), that Todays Mexicans are a result of Colonialism from Spain. Indeed, the term "Hispanic" means "of Spain."

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    3. there are a lot of other native Mexican Indians native to Mexico. The Hispanics are maybe 40 to 50 white families that rule Mexico and throw their poor on the backs of the American middle class taxpayer.

      Delete
    4. That is why I remind people my ancestors did not come here as immigrants, they came as invaders. I know what we did and I'm not dumb enough to let some other group do it to us.

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    5. The Navajos and the Apaches are both newcomers to the southwestern US. They arrived in New Mexico and Arizona about the same time as Columbus arrived in the Caribbean. Technically speaking, the Navajo are simply another band of Apaches; they adopted farming (and later sheep-herding) from the neighboring Pueblo tribes while he other Apaches did not.

      Delete
    6. The European Solutrean culture was here before everybody as artifacts prove. My country!

      Delete
    7. Check out the ethnicity of the President and cabinet of Mexico... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K84c7NlZzno&t=1s

      Delete
  11. If anybody on this Comment section knows how to make this go viral on You Tube, Facebook, etc. etc. please do it. I have copied so many Articles and sent to Donald Trump that I am ashamed to send another one right now.

    This is something that Donald Trump needs to read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sent this to Rush! Agree that it must go viral!

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    2. I just linked it on Facebook before starting to read the comments, so there you go.

      Delete
  12. DiploMad, even Trump doesn't have the cajones to do the right thing as regards Mexico.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Those are a lot of great points. Thanks for your service and point of view on this topic. I think it bears repeating how unified Mexicans are as group and their ruling elites appear to be just as unified in their common agenda of Mexicans first, all others at best a distant second. That holds true for Mexicans at home or abroad. Something that some Americans seem to despise in their own American brothers and can't really see a foreigner as having views that significantly impact them if different.
    Secondly, while there are distant rumblings in the media from time to time about the cartels in Mexico, there is not any where near enough attention being payed to Mexican gangsters and their enormous participation in the American drug trade. And the possible national security issues to our nation of these murdering criminals. Not to mention the huge damage being done to U.S. citizens from illegal drug consumption. Thanks and God bless America!!!

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    Replies
    1. It is US government policy to support the cartels with Prohibition.

      “Whose interests are served by the drug war? The U.S. government enforces a drug cartel. The major beneficiaries from drug prohibition are the drug lords, who can maintain a cartel that they would be unable to maintain without current government policy.” - - Milton Friedman

      Drugs are a problem. Drugs + criminal gangs are a much bigger problem. We learned that from Alcohol Prohibition. Didn't we?

      Delete
    2. Sorry, not good enough. Decriminalization may be an option. Whatever we are doing is certainly not working or working very well at curbing drug trafficking. I would say it is US government policy to support the cartels by not securing the border. And you have to wonder why? All of us have our opinions as to the "why". My point is more to the "what" has this vast network of Mexican gangsters created and how unified and nationalistic mexican gangsters and ordinary illegal Mexicans living in America tend to be.

      Delete
  14. maybe readers here would know the answer to this.. is there a list of mutual funds/financial institutions which are associated with the stupid BDS (boycott israel) crap? I'd like to avoid those (not just because their politics are terrible, but more generally because I don't see a good money-politics mix there).
    Is there a list? Some simple searching couldn't find one.

    - reader #1482

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  15. The US should allow no more Mexican consulates than the US has in Mexico.

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  16. U.S. banks launder cartel drug money and work with CIA. CIA created the Zetas.

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  17. The best defense of US sovereignty would be to end Drug Prohibition.

    Then the Mexican gangs can fight it out among themselves for what ever rackets remain.

    That should reduce the popularity of Mexico as an American tourist destination.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The author Edward Abbey is often credited for this pearl of wisdom.

    "The one thing we could do for a country like Mexico, for example, is to stop every illegal immigrant at the border, give him a good rifle and a case of ammunition, and send him back home. Let the Mexicans solve their customary problems in their customary manner".

    I'm willing to bet Mexico would make much greater effort of making improvements to the Mexican citizen's situation, helping all of them become successes given that treatment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I LIKE the way you think! {;o)

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    2. The only problem with that is that Mexico has NEVER had a representative govt. EVER.
      They would overthrow their tinpot banana republic and get the same or worse.

      Delete
  19. I published my take on the coming war with Mexico back in January. What ever the issues with building the wall, the opposition won't just be from the Mexican government. The US based operations of the Mexican drug cartels will readily act as a guerrilla force disrupting supply lines and attacking construction camps.

    https://theeveningchronicle.blogspot.com/2017/01/war-with-who.html

    ReplyDelete
  20. "
    That said, I also have long considered Mexico a major threat to America. I have dealt with Mexican diplomats at the UN, the OAS, and in Central and South America. They are first rate. They are patriotic, well-trained, dedicated, and hard working. They, almost to a man and a woman, are also possessed with a deep, deep animus towards the United States. At the UN and the OAS, for example, Mexico, in my experience, played the role of opponent to whatever we sought to do. They not only consistently voted against us, they collaborated with our opponents on resolutions and projects antithetical to our interests, and, for example, refused to oppose Cuban and Venezuelan human rights violations. They rarely passed on an opportunity to stick it in our eye."

    By "America" of course what is meant is the foul filth of Washington DC.

    Any "Enemy" of this is a friend of the American people.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Part of national sovereignty is the right of the citizens, both through democratic vote and individual reproductive decisions, to determine what the nation's population density should be. This metric strongly affects things like resource sustainability, quality of life, and access to solitude in nature. Nations which choose a responsible population path should NEVER be subject to having that choice overridden by either other nations which have chosen a less responsible path nor elites who view high populations as a source of high income.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Maxim 29:
    The enemy of my enemy is my enemy's enemy. No more. No less.

    -The Seventy Maxims of Maximally Effective Mercenaries (Howard Taylor)

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  23. Certainly true. Problem is no equitable solution be accepted by the snowflakes among us, the Democrats, or the mainstream media.

    Here is my advice to Trump -- Adopt the exact Mexican policy with respect to how Mexico treats immigrants. We all know that Mexico is completely repressive. When people claim racism, then just point out that we are merely copying Mexico's policy with respect to their borders.

    Then apply the same copy strategy for Voter-ID by adopting in the US the same standards that Mexico requires of Mexican Citizens voting in Mexico.

    Dip for a cabinet position! Trump should pick you.

    ReplyDelete
  24. "They, almost to a man and a woman, are also possessed with a deep, deep animus towards the United States". Hmmmm... I wonder why??? The US has always treated Mexico/Mexicans with utmost respect and dignity (sic).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One earns respect. Mexico has never been very respectable. (sic)

      Delete
  25. Great article. I knew our southern neighbor was screwing us in various ways, but I had no idea how bad it was.

    Not that I would expect to hear about this in the FakeStream media.

    Greetings from your newest reader.

    ReplyDelete
  26. We also need to do a great deal to dissolve that anti-Americanism, and even the cohesion, of the "Mexican diaspora," as the professoriate calls it. Certain organizations are openly treasonous. Other institutions perpetuate Spanish-only (or limited-English) from generation to generation. They must be stopped.

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    Replies
    1. In general we need all our immigrants to Americanize more thoroughly--and our native-born citizens, too.

      Delete
    2. According to our 26th president, there's no room in America for hyphenated Americanism.

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  27. Imho, the puzzler is why Flynn lied to the public, knowing his calls would have been recorded (even I as a hobby reader of espionage would have known those calls were recorded). And more important, why did he lie to Pence leaving Pence to go on the Sunday shows, repeat the lies and thereby wreck his own credibility? At that point what could Trump do but fire him? Unless I am missing something, this was an unforced error by Flynn. All he ever had to do was say that in preparation for his job he talked to lots of his counterparts, some a number of times and he listened to whatever they wanted to talk about, sometimes asked questions and said as does every incoming Administration does, the Trump Administration would be reviewing foreign policies, including sanctions. Period. Apparently that's more or less what he did. Why the lies about it? And the saga is odd. Trump apparently knew for a while. Why didn't he simply say that or tell Flynn to do so? How did it fall to Pence to go out and defend Flynn? And on lies? I think there is something odd or missing in what we know about this saga. (And no, I don't think Flynn was cutting deals with Russia.)

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  28. Question to Diplomad: do you know why Trump didn't bring Bolton into the Adminstration? I've never heard Bolton disparage Trump.

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  29. I discussed in my own blog that the coming war will be with Mexico. I think one of the greatest threats will come from Mexican drug gangs inside the US operating asda guerrilla force disrupting supply lines and attacking construction camps. Given their open distain for the value of human life on both sides of the border I wouldn't be surprised to see them kill Mexicans in the US and make it look like some sort of American vigilantism.

    http://theeveningchronicle.blogspot.com/2017/01/war-with-who.html

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  30. Pershing should have taken care of Mexico back in the day.

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  31. I would like to see Mexico pay for the wall by convicting all the illegals, putting them in a compound overseen by sheriff Joe Arpaio. They would then be given the choice of 6 months of incarceration, or working building the wall for 3 months, then they are sent back to Mexico.

    I would not spare sending back parents of anchor babies. It is up to them if they want to be separated from their children. They can leave them with a legal relative in the US (if one exists) or the child can go back with the parent. Simple!

    Bruce B

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  32. I believe what you say in the post. With your background and connections, it's too bad the most you can do about it is blog on it.

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  33. Diplomad where have you gone? Hope you and the family are doing ok.

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  34. Mexico claimed Texas as her territory, but never really controlled much of it. Mexico said 'This is our land!', but twenty thousand Commanche said 'No it isn't!'
    Did the Gringos steal Texas? Yep. But they stole it from the Commanche.

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  35. Why is this NOT being discussed by the Main Stream Media, instead of all this talk about Russia? What have the FBI, CIA, NSA, Homeland Security done about the New Mexican War?

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  36. I have become a little out of touch lately. Kindly please remind me, dear Diplomad, why the United States should not invade and conquer Mexico, putting its government officials (perhaps with exceptions) to death, annexing whatever parts promise a favorable balance of use over trouble, exiling whoever seems troublesome, and leaving the rest (if any) the hands of people who, whatever they may think of us, will remember what happened to their predecessors?

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