Featured Post

Tallying the Body Count: Bad Ideas vs. Good Guns

Oh, come, Mister tally man, tally me banana Daylight come and me wan' go home Me say come, Mister tally man, tally me banana Dayli...

Friday, January 26, 2018

The Arc de Trump: The President's New Nationalism Takes the Stage

He's done it again.

President Trump is THE rockstar of the global political world. I don't even know why other leaders bother showing up when this POTUS is in town. We see that President Trump has up-ended the usually silly gathering in Davos, Switzerland, traditionally a place for the international political and financial elites to meet, greet, spew empty platitudes, and tell each other how great and knowledgable they are--you, know, like the Oscars, but with snow.

He rode into town in great Flight of the Valkyries fashion: Marine One and its rotary-winged escorts beating a tattoo over the peaks and valleys of sub-arctic eastern Switzerland, a tattoo portending the arrival of The Revolution helmed by a 71-year-old billionaire real estate developer from Queens.

As I noted above, was anybody else at the meeting? Who knows? Who cares? Davos belonged to Trump. He gave an excellent, thoughtful, and concise explanation of The New Nationalism that he so ably represents.

I normally don't listen to politicians' speeches, much preferring to read them afterwards, but in this instance it was difficult to find the complete text, and one that was accurate, so I clicked over to YouTube and found it here.

Listen to it.

It is a simple, straightforward announcement of a revolution in the way we will conduct ourselves in the international marketplace. He makes clear that he will work for America First, not America Alone, and calls upon other leaders to put their countries first, as well.

He is calling, in no uncertain terms, for an end to the phony and destructive internationalism of the past few decades, the internationalism that has devastated towns and cities throughout the Western world, hollowed out once proud industrial centers, and made legions of mountebanks and blow-hards rich and powerful at the expense of the average Joe. He intends to use America's considerable clout to end that. He makes a good unvarnished case that doing so will benefit the "forgotten communities," and enable them, in the US, at least, to achieve a major portion of the American Dream, to wit, a good job, with good pay.

The world is formed of nation-states, and Donald Trump wants us to act in accordance with that reality.

Reality. What a revolutionary concept . . . . Trump is going to be a great president.

28 comments:

  1. I fear you're in for a terrible disappointment, Mr Mad. The world is riding for an economic collapse which will be nothing to do with Trump but which will be blamed on him because he will happen to be in office at the time. Unless of course They manage to shoot him before the collapse occurs, in which case Pence will be blamed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Economics is little more than a mass hallucination. The world is *always* riding for an economic collapse. It's faith that keeps it going.
      Capitalism isn't so much an economic model, as it is more similar to a religion. In a sense, it 'works' until the naysayers start shouting down the faithful.
      Just imo...

      - reader #1482

      Delete
    2. The next economic collapse might well occur from our Fed extracting $3.5 trillion from our money supply over the next few years. I say "might" because no one really knows.

      Delete
    3. LOL, Chicken Little said it more concisely: "The sky is falling, the sky is falling!"

      What a life of eternal disappointment you must suffer, dearleme. Sometime you ought to go outside and walk in the sunlight while you watch the clouds go by in the blue sky above. It might brighten your disposition!

      The only disagreement I have with Mr. Diplomad's post is that I would say (and DO say,) that President Donald J. Trump is *already* a great president! The greatest president of my long lifetime, and I thank God he arrived when he did: in the barest nick of time!

      Delete
    4. What Esky said.

      Barry

      Delete
    5. DM, I think you are probably correct. Debt money is a house of cards. When the house collapses, everyone is broke. That was the reason that young Will Shakespeare had to go to London to find work. It was the reason my grandfather went to Indiana, from East Texas, and the family fell apart. If it has happened before, it can happen again.

      Delete
    6. Michael Adams is NOT completely unknown.

      Delete
  2. This is a fun presidency to observe. I like the cut of the Trumpian jib.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was tired of apology tours, I wanted a fighter, and a winner for president. Early in the campaign, I started to see President Trump as quite possibly winning. I watched how he just bowled over all the structures put in place by the media and by democrats meant to make the campaign for president into a game of who is the most milquetoast pandering of them all. Trump just “Hulk Smash!” through it all and stared at the shocked bien pensant (To swipe the Dip’s term) with a “What ya going to do now”?
    As the campaign wore on, and I dared to speak of a possible president Trump to ears that could handle it, my saying was, “It’s Rushmore or Impeachment with him.”
    His complete brashness and confidence in himself (Yeah that horrible ego the media goes on about every day), made his election happen. Even given the fact that the deck was stacked against him, as slowly the tales start to unwind out of the F.B.I. and Justice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First American president in history to win a rigged election. Rigged against him by his opponent.

      Delete
    2. Samuel Tilden lost the election of 1876 to Rutherford Hayes. Now there as a rigged election that would even make the Empress Cacklepants blush.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. There was a deal to pull union troops out of the south when it was obvious tilden had won both popular AND the electoral vote.
      It was not disputed on either side that it was illegal, it was just decided by the powerbrokers to IGNORE the constitution.

      Delete
    5. I was strongly against Trump in the primary. Then I was stuck with him. Of course I voted for him, because the alternative was Hillary. Anyway, now that he is in office, I'm really learning to like him. great policy moves, plus he is making it obvious what a worthless pile the media are. So much winning, I'm hungry for more winning.

      Delete
    6. Yep!
      http://www.dumpaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Donald-Trump-Wins-funny-memes-1.jpg

      Delete
  4. " regulation is stealth taxation". Excellent. Great speech.

    ReplyDelete
  5. ..."was anybody else at the meeting? Who knows? Who cares? Davos belonged to Trump. He gave an excellent, thoughtful, and concise explanation of The New Nationalism that he so ably represents."
    ...

    "Listen to it."

    "It is a simple, straightforward announcement of a revolution in the way we will conduct ourselves in the international marketplace. He makes clear that he will work for America First, not America Alone, and calls upon other leaders to put their countries first, as well."

    ... National 'Greatness that is more than the sum of its production... values, pride, love, devotion, and character of the people'... yes, the Poetry of citizens thankful for the gifts their labors have produced, under the guiding hands of wisdom and divine providence! Poetic too, the thoughtful commentary and analysis, composed by our humble host! Hail Fellows Well Met!
    On Watch~~~
    "Let's Roll"

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Diplomad,

    Long time reader, first time to comment. I followed your link earlier today and watched Mr. Trumps speech and was very impressed, especially, when he said "I Believe in America". Nice to hear that coming from our C-in-C!

    I spent the last few hours thinking over the words and just now read James Delingpole's comments over at Breitbart. He closed with this:

    "Trump is offering the world a choice: one that has not been properly articulated by any Western leader since the era of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan. Do you choose to follow United States down the path of freedom, liberalised markets, low taxes, minimal government, civil order, security, controlled immigration, the pursuit of an acknowledged national interest? Or do you still want to follow Davos Man down the globalist path towards more regulation, more immigration, higher taxes and general embarrassment about the achievements of Western Civilization? Your move…"

    Thank you for your blog and please keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. especially, when he said "I Believe in America". Nice to hear that coming from our C-in-C!

      Every C-in-C says that, or something pretty similar. Some people only seem to hear it some of the time.

      Delete
  7. I hope we're having a comeback. Maybe the SCOTUS will wise up and say that just as a Jewish cakemaker may not be forced to celebrate Naziism in the name of non-discrimination, a devout traditionalist baker of most traditions will not be forced to celebrate sexual perversion either. If that happens, I will have hope for the nation.

    But, since the eunuch-in-drag-with-fake-tits Chelsea Manning is running for Senate in my state, I'm getting ready to surrender in the culture wars and go a step further--nominate Fucik's _Entry of the Gladiators_ for our new national anthem. It's perfect for the freaks and clowns parading in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Devout traditionalist bakers are *not* forced to celebrate any sort of sexual union. However, the businesses they run are required to serve everyone. There is a legal distinction between a business owner and there business, and it benefits the business owners in numerous ways. The price of taking advantage of this public service is to provide a public accommodation.

      Don't want to serve certain people? Don't open a business. Be a caterer for hire, or start a private club instead. You won't get the legal protections of a business, but you won't have serve anyone you don't want to.

      Delete
    2. The real question is SHOULD they be required to serve everyone? As a business owner, do you own and control the business or does the State? I would say that if someone refuses to serve someone you think they should serve, then maybe you should find another business to patronize.

      Delete
    3. Brad, the reason they are business owners is to get a bevy of protections and advantages from the state. Why shouldn't state protections come with state restrictions? If you want to avoid state restrictions entirely, it's easy enough: don't ask for the state protections that come from running a business corporation. Again, you can just be a private individual for hire, or start a private club, and discriminate to your heart's content.

      Delete
  8. Keep'em coming Diplo. Love your work. Have you seen this article about State? https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/26/politics/state-department-employees-hire-attorneys-political-retribution/index.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heh. I had just read that article before I came over here.
      If you have read the Dip for several years you know the State Dept. is bloated and inefficient.
      I am reminded of just before Christmas when I had a pile of paperwork, junk mail and bills piled up on the kitchen table. I decided to not do anything Christmas until I dealt with the paperwork. No shopping, decorating or baking until I got the paperwork under control.
      Sounds like that is what State is trying to do and boo-hoo for the pampered that think they are so important. Guess they'll just have to put their noses to the grind stone and turn out the FOIA requests.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for sharing that article. I was an FSO for 8 years, receive 2 Meritorious Honor Awards and was on the "fast track" in consular affairs. Walked away voluntarily from what could have been a lifetime career for a number of reasons: 1) disagreement with immigration policy; 2) inefficient State bureaucrats - never had a move that didn't have SOME issue/problem; 3) husband supported me in my career; wanted to have his own career too but not as an FSO or as a 'dependent' spouse. My response to the folks still at state (dare I call them snowflakes) who think they aren't appreciated....boo-hoo. If the immediate task/mission is to deal with the FOIAs, then do it as best as you can. Otherwise, move on.

      Delete
    3. At my last post, none of the more senior consular managers was a particularly good manager. Combined with President Clinton's China visit drawing away several of our line officers, we had a serious backlog of IV cases -- really bad, actually. It impacted the remaining FSO and local staff so much that I started getting involved (I worked in a completely different area) because I was trying to support and mentor the junior officers. (I was on my 3rd tour). All I had to do was talk to the local staff to figure out what was going on, the magnitude of the problem and develop a plan to get rid of the backlog which consisted primarily of cases coming back for reconsideration after additional documentation was submitted. I enlisted my American staff to review cases coming back for review, along with other consular managers and even the Consul General (who had been a consular manager). He did 5 cases a week and didn't complain. Everybody did what they had to do.

      Delete
  9. I think the last week beginning with the "shut down" and ending with the "memo vote" may become as important as anything that has happened since WWII.

    ReplyDelete