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Thursday, December 6, 2018

Is Paris Churning?

I have watched with fascination the recent unrest in Paris and other places in the Fifth Republic. Before, however, I make any comments, let me repeat my well-worn mantra that, "I am not an expert on France and don't pretend to be one." If you want expertise, do what I do, and read the excellent NO PASARAN blog.  There you will find spot-on analyses of what is happening in France, and how it is being misreported by the MSM. You might also want to give a read to the always fun and insightful Canadian The Rebel Media. They have posted some terrific raw video of the demonstrations in Paris and provided excellent commentary on what is happening. I will refer back to that video.

These sorts of events prove tough to place in their proper order of historical importance. I want neither to exaggerate nor minimize the impact of the current disturbances in France. Do they rate with those of May 1968? The February and June rebellions of 1848? The Paris Commune of 1871? A re-run of 1789? Perhaps it is just an ordinary, run-of-the mill street riot? I will let others more knowledgable decide, but, naturellement, that won't stop me from opining.

Now, to what I think I know.

France is in real trouble. I mean REAL trouble. That once great country, in fact, is dying. It, along with most of the rest of Europe, has a worthless leadership class that, as we saw at the WWI commemorations, sees nationalism as a bad thing. That leadership argues that true patriotism means going along with the elite's efforts to kill the sense, the very idea of nation; it means allowing one's culture, traditions, and history to be wiped away, and rewritten to justify the on-going social, economic and political destruction. To object, for example, to the importation of hundreds-of-thousands of poor, illiterate and often violent migrants from some of the most failed countries on earth, many espousing an ideology of hatred for all that France and Western Civilization represent, makes you a vile racist and a deplorable, one who should not be heard, a "far right" pariah. In other words, Citizen,  fermé la bouche and let your betters decide for you. Nothing to see, keep moving. Leadership should be left to the professionals; do not attempt decision-making at home . . .

The immediate cause of the disturbances in France is, of course, the "green tax" that the government sought to impose on French people. In the name of protecting Gaia, the already sky-high fuel prices in France were to be hit with additional taxes. That, however, is only the tip of the iceberg. The foolish economic and social policies of France (and the EU) are making average French people into poor people. To an even greater extent than we have seen on these shores, the middle class is being eliminated, ground into dust. I read some interesting stats on France which now I can't find that showed that the average French citizen is out of money by the 20th of the month. Of course, it's all very different if you have a senior government or EU job. As one of the Diplosons commented to me the other day, "What does a young Frenchman do to accumulate wealth?" Most avenues to potential wealth are heavily taxed, regulated, or otherwise controlled and put out of the reach of the average person. The French education system is a leftist disaster--Perhaps even worse than ours? Hard to believe--and produces the usual crop of highly credentialed and useless morons now standard fare in the West. On top of it all, the chocolate on the soufflé, France continues to support the immigration of other countries' poor. What possibly could go wrong? Rhetorical question, folks, the list of answers is too long . . .

Back to the riots. One thing that struck me was some Rebel Media video in which you can see, through the swirling clouds of tear gas, demonstrators waving the Tricolor and hear them--gasp!-- singing La Marseillaise, arguably the most stirring national anthem in the world. I am not French and don't pretend to be, but that gave me goose-bumps. It, more importantly, also showed that these are not your run-of-the-mill Antifa-type thugs on the street. We might be seeing the rise of militant nationalism in revolt against the elitist globalism that has ruled and ruined the West for the past fifty or so years. De Gaulle would have been proud . . .

France's absurd President Macron has backed off for now on the new taxes--Gaia can wait, I guess. I don't think, however, that he and his fellow "leaders" have gotten the message. Perhaps France needs a President Trump to drive home that it's time to Make France Great Again? I also wonder how a Frexit vote would look? Fat chance that will be allowed . . . so, France continues to churn.

California should emulate the French citizens in the street. Right.



21 comments:

  1. "What does a young Frenchman do to accumulate wealth?" Why, sir, he moves to London.

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  2. There is another problem in France. It's not a terribly open society. First I cite a young Frenchman, whom I congratulated on getting a plum academic job in Britain. "Thank you; I couldn't have got the equivalent job in France, you know." Naturally I replied that there was no equivalent job in France; France doesn't have a Cambridge. Ha, ha.

    But then I asked him why. "Because my first degree is from a university of no distinction." Me: "But why would that matter: you shone for your PhD at Cambridge?" "That would be of no importance: your first degree must be from one of a small number of institutions. Your lycée and family would help too, and I had no help there".

    Add to that the notorious difficulty of founding your own business in France and it's no wonder that young Frenchmen move to London or Kent to pursue a career or found a business.

    One thing that struck me about this conversation is that I'd had rather similar conversations with a young German and two young Italians over the preceding couple of decades - they just found Britain far more open than their homelands - more meritocratic, if you like, and less socially restrictive.

    And if what I've learnt from American blogs is true, in Britain it's easier and cheaper and quicker to found your own business than it is in many parts of the US: you don't need a licence to do this, that, and the other. Corporation tax is lower (19%) than it has been in the US until recently.

    And yet we complain - rightly - of the burden of regulation. Much, of course, comes from the EU and therefore reflects a German/French mindset rather than our own traditions, but a lot is home-generated too.

    Something must be done, or the next Man on a White Horse won't be a relatively benign figure like Trump.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I'd had rather similar conversations with a young German " I know a German plumber who, with his wife, waited years for a visa lottery and finally were able to immigrate to Tucson AZ. She was a midwife and they had save 60,000 Euros to start a business. He told me they never could have started their own company in Germany. That was ten years ago and they are doing well.

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  3. Perhaps France needs a de Gaulle.

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    1. I dunno... De Gaul ... everything I've read about him was so roundly negative... so leftist, so focused on his ego and frenchiness... he barely deigned to ask for help.. and then gave people all kinds of grief *FOR TRYING TO FREE FRANCE*.
      iirc, Churchill and Roosevelt had nothing good to say about him.

      But now I think I see your point. He might've been an uppity paper tiger, but he did push the fight. If the panzer corps rolled into france now, there would be nobody there, as the entire government would be sipping cocktails in the Bahamas pretending they'd never heard of a country named France.

      - reader #1482

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    2. I recently read a pretty good biography of DeGaulle and I think he was just a French Churchill. A bit out of date in the culture but a patriot whose stuffiness was just a mask for his despair at the 1940 debacle.
      https://www.amazon.com/Gaulle-Julian-Jackson/dp/0674987217/

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    3. Not really a fan of DeGaulle. Having had his country perform abysmally in 1940, he spent the rest of the war undercutting and denigrating the very nations which rescued France.

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    4. That wasn't just DeGaulle, that was the large majority of French generals. It wasn't just being difficult and nasty to Britain and the US, but incredible infighting between different factions of them. One American officer who was a witness to the high-level shenanigans throughout the North African campaign said it was no wonder they lost to the Germans. It sounded pretty much like the People's Front of Judea versus the Judean People's Front versus the Peoples Popular Front of Judea versus the Romans. By the time they got to the last 'versus' and the Romans ("and what have the Romans ever done for us, anyway?"), they'd nearly killed each other off.

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  4. Replies
    1. "Is Paris Churning?" ... do you mean... butter? :)

      - reaader #1482

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  5. I would also appreciate your comments on the UN Global Migrant Compact. The USA and Australia refuse to sign. France will do.
    Here is my letter to my local leftist rag in New Zealand:.. " The compact is legally binding and NZ Courts would have to consider it. It blocks signatory nations from restricting migration conditions. The “Right to Migrate” would become a "human right" to be enforced by international law. It requires nations to actively orchestrate global migrations and insists that the “well-being of migrants”, including illegals, must come before existing citizens. It instructs governments to implement laws and harsher penalties for crimes against migrants but says nothing about crimes committed by migrants. It calls on governments to intervene in the media, to promote positive stories about migrants and to cut off media outlets that report the whole truth, criminalising those opposing immigration. It ignores the effect of mass migration on the host country and its citizens. What about our families, our communities, our civilisation? It is no coincidence that that the Pact is being signed in an Islamic country and that more and more countries including Australia refuse to sign it. Where is the information and debate in this country?"

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    1. Personally, I recommend that the good citizens of every polity should execute any of their politicians and bureaucrats that endorse, sign, ratify, or enforce any such treaty.

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    2. I agree whole-heartedly. This current situation will not be solved without bloodshed. There are vast interests who have had power for decades now and they will not just turn around and give up because mere citizens want it to stop. They are going to have to be killed in some number and the entire structure they've built torn down and made ash. If all the western world can muster is an occasional protest that fizzles out when people get tired, there won't be a west at the end of the century.

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    3. Anon,
      this will not happen as long as governments can give its citizens transfer payments which keeps them out of the streets.

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    4. Stewart, Good letter. I am going to write something about that Migration deal. It's a another prog fraud. It poses a particular threat to relatively small and law abiding countries such as NZ.

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  6. The irony being that Trump would in many ways suit France better than the United States. Certainly they would have less trouble with his romantic escapades.

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    1. True. Trump would be revered much as Jerry Lewis has been in France. Crazy. Zany. They love him.

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  7. It's a lengthy but interesting article. Copy and paste this into your browser:

    https://www.scribd.com/document/377409983/Gohmert-Mueller-UNMASKED

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    1. This article is more than interesting, it is amazing. Yes, it is a long read but it sums up in a coherent way what, exactly, has been going on since 9-11. I'm actually surprised that a Congressman would put his name to this, it is so damning.
      If you want to really annoy yourself read the book Terrorist Hunter by anonymous.After I put the book down I was spitting mad about the rank incompetence of our intelligence personnel. This woman, a refugee from Iran to Israel to NYC, was able to figure things out through OPEN SOURCE information that our brave intelligence community hadn't a clue about.
      The part of this essay describing the purging of Islamic intelligence and the "5 and out" of Mr Mueller's reign is sickening. Regular readers of this kind of info know full well that Maj. Conklin and Rob't Spencer were fired under Mr. Mueller and the Obama cartels "transformation" of our intelligence community.
      Really, you've got to read this.

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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