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Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Australia! Stop Scaring Me!

OK, I have been holding off commenting on the elections Down Under.

First of all, I had violated the Diplomad Rule of Politics 101: Ignore the polls especially when they show the Progs will win when it doesn't make sense. I had read the polls which, almost universally predicted a Labor victory validating Bill Shorten's emphasis on Global Climate Change, and the need to dismantle Australia's economy and society as a sacrifice to the Junk Science and the Open Borders Creed of the Cult of Global Prognazism.

I also held back, frankly, because Australia has a rather sophisticated voting system which requires, I thought, a deep understanding of complex Quantum Mechanics in order to tally the votes. I, furthermore, had had my deepest schooling on Australian vote counting by watching one of my favorite shows, Rake, with the nefarious schemer Clever Greene (played by the outstanding Richard Roxburgh) strategizing to get himself elected Senator by a wonderfully complex--for me--use of the preferential voting provision.

So I held back my celebration. Had Labor actually won? The Diplomad pondered, fretted, tossed and turned . . .

Fortunately, an Aussie friend explained how the system actually works, and, while I still don't like mandatory voting, I find that it's not bad at all.

So it seems we can celebrate!

The good guys have won when they were expected to lose. ScoMo scored more. Judging from the shocked reaction of the progs in Australia and their globalist buddies at the New York Times, this Morrison win just "weren't supposed to be."

I have been having a wonderful time reading the twists and turns of the prog media trying to explain the Liberal coalition victory. The explanation basically comes down to the people are morons! They have rejected the one and true faith! They didn't really know what they were voting for! We have had five hot summers so we must return to the Middle Ages! Morrison MUST, I tell you, Must now develop a Climate Change Plan that will appease those who lost the election running on Climate Change nonsense! And on, and on, and on. It was akin to that fabulous night in November 2016 when the Progs sustained another massive mule kick to their transgender nether regions. It recalled the recent Israeli elections and, of course, BREXIT, horribly sabotaged by May and her Deep State.

The Progs . . . they love humanity and hate people.

Keep Australia Great!

40 comments:

  1. The Dems should be paying attention and taking heed, but I doubt they will. I certainly hope that our election results are an unpleasant surprise to them come the day after in 2020. Just like 2016!

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  2. There is a physiology term for this state of mind of the Prog: Oikophobia.

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  3. The TransNationalProgressives (Communists-aka-Oligarchists) believe that lying about an election will be a self fulfilling prophecy. I hope they choke on their hypocrisy but they won't. They are too far gone down the road of bad intentions.

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  4. As our host says, the Australian election system is quite complex. Looking at votes cast, it is not clear whether this election result is a rejection of Leftie climate alarmism -- or whether it is an example of the undemocratic nature of democracy.

    With something like 76% of votes counted, the 4 party ruling Coalition had about 5.0 Million votes, and are projected to win 78 seats (a majority in the 151-member Australian House of Representatives).

    The climate-changing Labor & Green parties jointly had 5.3 Million votes (300,000 more votes than the Coalition), but are projected to win only 68 seats.

    Other parties had 1.8 Million votes, but are projected to win only 5 seats.

    Australia may have been saved from a climate-changing government (which the democratic plurality wants) by the uneven distribution of votes which gave an advantage to the ruling Coalition. I am not sure what we should conclude from this.

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    1. Thanks Gavin. Very useful You ask what we should conclude? Be grateful for miracles from wherever they come.

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  5. Pssst!... His name is MorriSON.

    That aside, Australia was, just like the USA, started as tiny settlements. These soon became "colonies", then grew more to become "States". Then, after the usual bickering, came "Federation". The primary difference is that the American colonies did NOT have a large proportion of "Convict" inhabitants and their attendant bureaucratic "logistic train" right from day one. Australia was and still is, a "Government Project', with all that such implies and actually involves. For something closer to home, look over your northern border to see what can happen to an otherwise nice country. As they sing: "Oh.....Canada!" Then realize that there are powerful internal forces trying to "Turdeau" the USA.

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    1. Interesting observations.

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    2. ScoMo is what he is called locally... an abbreviated form of his full name, Scott Morrison. We love to abbreviate everything in Oz!
      Karen in Australia

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  6. Gavin is right in terms of the number of "first preference" votes. However our system is one of preferential voting. In simple terms you put a 1 against the candidate you want. You then must number the other candidates in the electorate in order that you would want to see them elected if your first preference is last in the number of votes cast in the electorate. If he/she gets the lowest number of first preference votes then the second preference on the ballot paper has the vote apportioned to them and so on until one candidate has 50% of the vote plus one.

    Some people like the system, some don't but it is the system we have and generally it works well.

    As to compulsory voting people have a range of views as to whether it is good or not.

    For a breakdown of the recent election see

    https://www.news.com.au/national/federal-election/raw-voting-figures-reveal-the-real-losers-in-saturdays-shock-election/news-story/8401c6ad677fae3ca6af0bd9a6ce161d

    Whichever way you look at it the so called expert political analysts got it wrong and we have been saved from a far left ideological disaster.

    With respect to the comment by Bruce that Australia was and still is a Government Project fails to understand the generally independent nature of the average "Aussie" and their dislike of government at whatever level sticking its nose into his/her affairs.

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    1. Yeah.. the vote in the US would be very different if all the third party voters got second shots at being kingmaker between the dems and republicans.

      - reader #1482

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  7. From the article David linked:
    "The lesson, as in all modern elections, is not how many votes a party gets, but where they are cast. The Liberals won 27.76 per cent of the primary vote and Labor 33.86 per cent. But we know who won the election. For example, Labor supporters would have been chocking the ballot boxes in inner city electorates, but that predominance of voters changed nothing. The ALP was almost always going to win those seats."

    It seems analogous to the US situation where winning the critical Electoral College vote is different from winning the irrelevant national popular vote.

    We should be careful about assuming the Coalition victory in Australia demonstrates that Australians have seen through the Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming scam. Or that they are rejecting Leftie policies in general. Maybe God takes care of Australia as well as America?

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    1. Let us hope that God can multitask . . .

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  8. RUSSIA!!!
    It must be COLLUSION!

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  9. This may be helpful. Hope so at any rate:

    https://audioboom.com/posts/7267755-australia-s-left-speaks-candidly-about-the-cost-of-climate-change-and-loses-the-election-gregory

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  10. OK, I have been an Australian for nearly 60 years (I was English before my parents brought me here). I reckon there were three reasons the Labor Party lost Nationally. First the man expected to become the next treasurer (in charge of the national accounts)while trying to justify his promised attacks on retirees income, lost his temper and told a room full of pensioners "If you don't like our policies don't vote for us." They didn't. Second you can't tell residents in one State (Queensland) you aren't going to block a mine that will create 25,000 jobs while telling the residents of another state (Victoria) that you will. If you are going to introduce the most sweeping Climate change legislation ever, you have to be prepared to tell people what it will cost and not call people who want to know the cost "morons". The rest was mostly local issues seat by seat.

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    1. Thanks, very useful--sounds like American politics . . .

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  11. Australia is no friend of the United States.

    They may not be as perniciously malignant as Japan or Britain, but they have been no less damaging as a conduit for foreign influence - MacArthur's obsession with the Philippines and focus on Australia was a mistake and many American military veterans would be alive were it not for the diversion of valuable resources to Australia, parasitizing Nimitz's overall belief in a direct attack on Japan. It was no mistake after the War that Britain and Japan became the inspiration and focal points for the Counter-culture of the 60s - debasing American tradition in favor of foreign ideas of sexual revolution, victim psychology, and rule by the elites, from the defeated (Japanese Empire) and expended (British Empire).

    From the beginning of America and the violent divergence of America and the British Empire, to the attempted coup of Trump by Her majesty's British and Australian lackeys, it is not forgotten that Britain is principally a historic enemy of the United States - in fact, the worst enemy in America's history. Nobody was nearly as successful as the British in attacking and subjugating America, arming America's enemies, and fomenting domestic insurrections in America in a full blown Civil War and a series of Indian Wars. The temporary detente with Britain in WW2 should have ended immediately after hostilities just as in WW1 - and most loyal Americans agree, recognizing the folly of alphabet soup organizations such as the United Nations - and NATO has been used to sell "War guarantees", presuming "automatic war" in the service of a foreign entity, in direct violation American Constitutional mandates that Congress alone can declare war.

    But for all their overreach, Presidents like Truman and Eisenhower never forgot that British interests were fundamentally opposed to American interests. Now, though, too many elites especially in the diplomatic corps have forgotten what Harry and Ike wisely kept mindful of, and Americans have long remembered. Many diplomats were scandalized that "Prince Harry" was not accorded much respect in the US Military, particularly among Afghan veterans who know his prima-donna behaviour, towing a cadre of PR officials and bodyguards in Afgthanistan...

    ...taking credit for being "involved" in combat operations, but never setting foot beyond Helmand's remote base's safety - nowhere near the Pakistan border - and fleeing the country when his mere presence was noted.

    Don't even ask about the Australian contingent and their "indispensable role" in Afghanistan. Afghan troops murdering American Major Generals were more helpful to us than Australians - at least these Afghan acts of treachery forced the State Dept to accede to military demands to freeze out Afghan participation in sensitive operations and intelligence.

    Instead, Australians were given the keys to roost with 5 eyes...

    ...and even after seeing the damage they have wrought upon America's Republic and democratic systems (The Trump hoax is only the tip of the iceberg, and Adm ROgers knows it), too many insiders are resisting recommendations fromt eh rank-and-file that access to American databases be returned to NO-FORN status.

    I understand Diplomad regards the idea of foreign "allies" as sacrosanct in that he believes they are required for American moral authority. As a diplomat, he is given to such perverse delusions.

    But most Americans are not - few people care about Australia and only regard it as a vacation destination in travel brochures. I can only hope the investigation advertises "Her Majesty's" continued treachery as her Australian hand-maidens - from Downer to Taloni - have been caught red-handed.

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    1. I can't agree with any of that. The Aussies have been great allies and friends, as I know from personal experience. Australian troops have fought with American troops in both World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq-- US troops fought under the command of General Monash in WWI, the greatest general of WWI. Australia has provided consistent intel and operational support, as well. The Aussies are friends and allies, and I am delighted that they avoided (for now) the fate the lefties have in in mind for them and us and all the West.

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    2. But for proximity, I think I'd rather Australia as #31 than California.

      - reader #1482

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    3. I've invited for myself on 'That Sage of Somerset' site occasional umbrage for having the temerity to state in so many words that, "Yes you Brits and Aussies bear some responsibility for what's roiled our [US] current situation." However I've thought to temper my observations by including the (sort of) disclaimer that "while 'friends and allies' national interests sometimes overlap those national interests never exactly and perfectly align." That that ought be perfectly understood and accommodation made for ought not be cause for our nations to be striving against that which we generally agree on.

      Far as not 'even asking' where Afghanistan's concerned I suggest we heed the wise counsel of Field Marshal Slim: "Nothing is so good for the morale of the troops as occasionally to see a dead general".

      JK

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    4. Terrekains comments are plain ass dumb. Britain is responsible for debasing the USA? Twit.

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    5. "and Americans have long remembered"
      Anytime one presumes to speak for the many, one negates ones own argument me thinks..
      That said Downer and Co (there is no way he was in this on his own and we should look hard at all those who have left. Turnbull, Bishop, Pyne etc ) should be hung up by their toes..

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  12. During WW2, Australia was essentially "garrisoned" by US troops from 1942 onward.

    My mother worked in the typing pool in MacArthur's headquarters in Brisbane. She was straight out of high-school / "commercial college". US P-61 Black Widows and other long-range aircraft operated from the Eagle Farm Airfield not far from where she lived. Townsville, in North Queensland went from a glorified fishing village on a swamp to a huge logistics and operational centre. My father was a motor mechanic with an artillery unit there and was preparing vehicles for Operation Coronet / Olympic when the "Enola Gay" visited Hiroshima. There was MUCH rejoicing. In related news, most of the British heavy night-bomber fleet was slated to join in the oriental festivities before Mr. Tibbets and his merry band showed up, followed by the encore performance from "Bock's Car".

    Australia provided a physical springboard and logistics hub for US and Australian forces. The surviving aircraft and crews from the Netherlands East Indies Air Force operated out of northern Australia against the Japanese occupiers of their previous residence.

    Brisbane and Fremantle hosted major USN submarine traffic.

    On the other hand, the communist party of Australia was VERY busy, beginning "activities even before the Nazis invaded Poland. Their union operators shut down coal and other mines, refused to unload ships carrying war-stores for Australian troops oversea. They also stole or damaged cargo including aircraft arriving in Australia. This was on instruction from on high. ONLY after Hitler broke the Ribbentrop / Molotov pact did the mongrels start behaving themselves, again on orders from Moscow. The Soviets had seriously infiltrated Australian politics, unions, academia and media BEFORE WW2.

    See also the Soviet's almost total penetration and subversion of British intelligence bodies.

    Before you get too smug, the US was hardly free from deep Soviet penetration before, during and after WW2. Given the publicly stated "philosophies" of certain US political figure, past and present, the flame still burns in the hearts (such as they are) of quite a few "notables".

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    1. IRT your comment that "Before you get too smug, the US was hardly free from deep Soviet penetration before, during and after WW2." Yeah, given that Brennan and Comey admitted to voting for and/or being communists in the 1970's ( https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-16/both-comey-and-brennan-both-voted-communist-while-cold-war-was-raging ) and ( http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/politics/n_9353/ ). Of course, I'm also not including Valerie Jarrett, David Axelrod and Jeh Johnson being a red diaper babies ( https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/homeland-security-chief-jeh-johnson-another-obama-red-diaper-baby/ )

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    2. So it seems we in the USA have our share of communist infiltration, too.

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    3. Very interesting, Bruce. I lived in Australia, mostly W.A. for over 30 years, and found Oz to be a fascinating place with a great deal of- to me- incomprehensible attitudes and ways of thought.

      One thing that struck me was that there seemed to be a fair bit of resentment against Americans, just for being Americans; one explanation that made sense to me was that in WWII, Americans- as you said- "was essentially "garrisoned" by US troops." Before the war, Aussies were much more "macho" than afterward; the womenfolk weren't usually treated to gifts of chocolate candy or flowers by their menfolk, and courting was very different then.

      During WWII, Australia was used for R&R by the Allies, so a lot of US servicemen dated Aussie women, many of whom had Aussie boyfriends/husbands who were away fighting. The US servicemen not only had a pocket full of cash, they'd been getting paid but had nowhere to spend their money until they got to Oz, but also were used to bringing women gifts such as flowers, chocolates, stockings- and they had a whole different attitude toward women than the Aussie menfolk had.

      So when the Aussie men came back from the war, they found their womenfolk "spoiled!" They now demanded gifts, they wanted more equality, they weren't nearly as subservient as they had been before, and many husbands found themselves being divorced in favour of American ex-servicemen who relocated to Australia.

      I'd say there's some truth to that tale, though how much I don't know; but I can attest to the fact that many Aussies will refuse to do something the way an American would do it, just because they don't want to agree with those damned Yanks!

      BTW- I was shocked at meeting many Aussies who identified themselves openly as socialists or communists; this was not common in the USA back then.

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    4. Grrr. "...in WWII, AUSTRALIA was- as you said..." Oh, for an edit button!

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    5. Tony from LauncestonMay 22, 2019 at 8:40 PM

      I spent a lot of time in Sydney during the fiasco of Vietnam. The same was true then. Sydney was the R&R town for a lot of US servicemen. It meant that Sydney ended up with a sophisticated night life that didn't end at 10pm like pretty much everywhere else in Oz but also the women got used to nice young men who who took off their hats and called them "Ma'am" or "Miss" and bought them gifts.

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  13. Totally off topic, but something I thought worth your reading time:

    https://politichicks.com/2019/05/open-letter-to-ca-gov-newson-from-a-parent-whose-kids-are-leaving-the-state/

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  14. The Progs . . . they love humanity and hate people.

    I'm putting you on notice that I am going to commandeer that line.

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    1. There's a "Peanuts" cartoon for that:

      https://www.philipchircop.com/post/4372522160/i-love-humanity-its-people-i-cannot-stand

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  15. So Daoun Unda sends a message...

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  16. The Aussies have been great allies and friends, as I know from personal experience. Australian troops have fought with American troops in both World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq-- US troops fought under the command of General Monash in WWI, the greatest general of WWI.

    Dip, you must remember that globalist elites are their own nationality,
    "All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state. "

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  17. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  18. I've lived in Oz for 35 years now and have mixed thoughts on the preferential system. This election, it took me about 40 minutes to work out how I wanted to preference my votes for the House of Reps and for the Senate.

    We have a lot of minor parties running, especially in the Senate. I think I counted 28 groups on the Senate ticket with a total of approx 70 individuals in those groups. We had to choose to number 1-6 if we voted by group, or 1-12 if we voted for individuals.

    You might find it interesting that a full week after the polls closed, they are still counting votes. In my electorate, they haven't finished counting votes for the House of Reps. And they've barely started counting the votes for the Senate for the state I'm in (Victoria).

    At this point, we know the Lib/Nats led by Scott Morrison have a majority in the House of Reps, but we don't know what the Senate will look like yet.

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    1. Believe us Karen Bunyk, some of us at any rate, come back to older comment threads paying attention.

      You'll return when "It's (completely) decided?"

      We look forward to your observing.

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    2. I'll update you as I can... but they are still counting

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  19. ... and they're still counting. In my electorate, they have counted 93% of votes cast. And they haven't even started distributing preferences in the Senate. So 3 weeks after we voted, Scott Morrison has taken the house and is prime minister, but we don't know the make up of the Senate.

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